Category Archives: activism

peace by chocolate on valentine’s day and every day.

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This is a true and incredible human story, of a refugee family losing everything, leaving their home, and finding a new home and new life in an unexpected place and in unexpected ways. I’ve been following their story since their arrival in Canada and they are a wonderful example of will, grit, tenacity, family, compassion, overcoming odds, and a sheer refusal to give up. They are paying it forward by giving back to the people in their new community and beyond. Supporting those who welcomed them and may need the help that they so generously received when they were in desperate need. Plus, their chocolate in incredible.

So exciting!

We are so happy to announce that the movie based on our story, Peace by Chocolate – The Film is coming to theatres, exclusively at Cineplex across Canada on May 6th and the official trailer of the movie was finally released. This movie is a platform to share hope with Canadians and the world -something we all need more than anything these days. See you all at the theatres this spring. (no date yet for u.s. or international openings)

“generosity is not giving me that which I need more than you do,

but it is giving me that which you need more than I do.”

-khalil gibran

today’s the day.

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my spirit animal
Last year, five animal candidates vied for the much sought-after title of Mayor of Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo. This important election decided the Zoo’s first Mayor, the highest-ranking animal official who showcased the important role of animal ambassadors. One of the five candidates, (and my favorite), who made it past the primary rounds to the general election was:

Peaches the Nigerian dwarf goat. Peaches is the mother of two sets of triplets and a set of twins. She has raised all the kids on her own, demonstrating her can-do spirit. She’s quiet and friendly unless she needs to assert herself and is rarely in a baaaaad mood.

P.S. Wiggles the Chinchilla got the most votes and won by a hair. 

“not voting is not a protest. It is a surrender.”

-keith ellison

 

 credit: lisa clair, hamlet hub

art house.

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the kinder created a new house for the fairies

after their old house broke apart

and they had nowhere to live.

after learning about detroit artist, tyree guyton,

they created the house in his artistic style

and placed it in the garden

where beautiful flowers were just beginning to bloom.

“life itself is an art form”

-tyree guyton (creator of the heidelberg project)

https://www.tyreeguyton.com/about

open society.

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 powerful messages found everywhere

 

“in an open society, no idea can be above scrutiny, just as no people should be beneath dignity.”

-maajid nawaz

 

grand trunk pub, detroit, michigan, usa -2020

r.i.p. rbg.

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Ruth Bader delivers a sermon as camp Rabbi at the age of 15, at Che-Na-Wah camp in Minerva, N.Y. (Photo: Supreme Court of the United States)

 

 

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg photographed
on the occasion of her 20th anniversary on the bench in 2013.
Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

honor.

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no finer way to honor this hero

“the vote is the most powerful nonviolent tool we have.”

-john lewis

 

 

image credit: michigan theatre, ann arbor, michigan, usa

get in the way.

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The Bloodiest Sunday 

Bloody Sunday was a cruel incident that occurred on March 7, 1965  in Selma, Alabama. Six hundred orderly protesters were ready to march to Selma on a Sunday to support the Voting Rights Movement. They were led by John Lewis, SNCC, and SCLC activists. All six hundred of them crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, but were blocked by Alabama State Troopers. The police commanded them to turn around, but the protesters refused. The police say ‘they had no choice’ other than to start shooting teargas into the crowd, and beating the non-violent protesters. Sadly, they hospitalized over sixty people. To this day, Lewis still has a visible scar on his forehead from Bloody Sunday. This week, I watched as you made one final trip over that bridge, in your casket, with Alabama State Troopers saluting you, and people holding you in their hearts for all you did for them. You will always be remembered as a brave and compassionate leader who truly led by example.

RIP, John Lewis, thank you for always getting in the way, and showing us how it’s done.

 

“you must be bold, brave, and courageous and find a way… to get in the way.”

-john lewis