Category Archives: performance

dark side of the moon.

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sitting

in total darkness

 absolute silence

very slowly

one by one

notes

chords

pinpoints of light 

pierced the air

  sitting in my seat 

48 years ago

in detroit

pink floyd

unfolded their new album

dark side of the moon 

right before my eyes and ears

in real time

playing full out

the crowd

mesmerized 

just taking it all in

vibrating

then roaring in appreciation

one of my most memorable live concert experiences ever.

 

“it was like being in the eye of a hurricane. you’d wake up in a concert and think – wow how did i get here?”

-john lennon

 

48 years ago Pink Floyd released Dark Side of the Moon.

It remained in the US charts from 1973 to 1988, longer than any other album in history.

 

album cover photo: harvest records

poetic.

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last weekend

at the 44th annual ann arbor folk festival

 5 live streamed hours on saturday night

every kind of music and performance

big and small

i once again

heard beautiful poems played

by my favorite pianist

george winston

whose song ‘thanksgiving’ i heard for the very first time

many years ago on the radio while on a road trip to toronto

having no idea who it was or what the song was

 being very moved by it

not knowing if i’d ever hear it again

  serendipity stepped in

when driving back home

with a windham hill artists’ compilation cd

an unexpected gift from my host

on which he was a featured artist playing that very song.

“music is the divine way to tell beautiful, poetic things to the heart.”

-pablo casals

magic all around you.

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One hundred years ago this month, the magician P.T. Selbit ushered his assistant into an upright wooden box, sealed it, laid it flat, and got down to business, sawing the box right down the middle. The show, according to magic experts, was the first time a performer ever sawed someone in half. Why has this trick survived, when so many others haven’t? If you ask magicians, NYT writer Alex Marshall spoke with six — they eventually land on one answer. “It’s just the simplicity of it,” said Mike Caveney, a magician who’s writing a history of this trick. “Magicians say a good trick is one that can be described in a few words, and ‘sawing a lady in half’ is very few words,” he added. As for being the assistant, “When you’re doing it you’re not a passive person,” one magician said. “It’s claustrophobic, and quite noisy, but such fun!”

” i believe your reality is what you make it, what you choose to see, and what you choose to allow yourself to do.

there are possibilities all around you – magic all around you – no matter what situation you’re in.”

-keke palmer

Story credit: Alex Marshall, NYT- Image credit: Nolan Pellitier

 

the circus arrives.

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to avoid crowds, montreal’s circus festival will pop up in random places

Over the course of this week, some lucky residents in Montreal will be entertained with surprise circus acts that will pop up around the city at undisclosed locations.

The outdoor performances are organized as part of Montreal’s annual circus festival and are taking place from July 6 to 12 at random locations around the city in order to avoid huge crowds from gathering and maintain physical distancing.

As artistic director of Montréal Complètement Cirque, Nadine Marchand explains, a truck called the “Bonheur Mobile” will roll up to alleys, parks, streets, and squares in Saint-Michel, Anjou, St. Henri and the Quartier des Spectacles (to name a few) over the next week.

Ten Quebec circus performers will come rolling out and put on an hour-and-a-half-long show for any unsuspecting Montrealers who happen to be passing by or looking out the window.

Apart from breathing life and joy into the city, the festival has also been organized with the goal of providing work for the artists, as many have been out of work and unable to perform or tour due to the pandemic and it’s not clear when their industry will be back up and running.

Those lucky enough to happen upon one of these surprise performances are asked to stay on their front steps and balconies to avoid getting too close to others.

“the circus arrives without warning.”

-erin morgenstern, the night circus

 

 

 

story credits: marilla steuter- martin, cbc news, daily optimist magazine

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