Tag Archives: autumn

harvest moon.

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“harvest moon: around the pond i wander and the night is gone.”



-matsuo basho 


 

 

 

art credit: ‘harvest moon’ –  painting by nancy bush

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falling.

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fall is only ‘fall’ to americans, even though the term was coined in britain.

what do you call the picking of ripe sweet potatoes, apples, squash and pumpkins?

harvest.

that was the word used until the 1300s to describe the next few months of weather.

because “harvest” also meant the gathering of ripe crops, when the word “autumn” showed up in english writing, its popularity soared.

some time after, poets coined the phrase “the fall of leaves” — shortened to “fall” in the 1600s.

the word “autumn” still remained popular throughout england’s period of colonizing the world.

the lack of consistent communication between the english and the people in the american colonies led to differences in the language.

by the mid-1800s, the word “fall” had firmly rooted itself in america.

and apparently something was again lost in translation

when communicating with mother nature

as yesterday was the official first day of 

fall/harvest/autumn

and our temps in michigan were in the 90s. 

(photo: fuller park, ann arbor, mi, usa)

 

 

 

credit: cnn news

leaf chaps.

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with fall comes the ultimate scourge of lawn work: raking leaves. all of those gorgeous, oxygen-giving trees in your backyard become instruments of torture, littering their leafy bounty all over the lawn and sidewalk.

according to the inventor of the the leaf pants, the leaves aren’t the problem. it’s the rake – that pronged nightmare that strains backs, blisters hands, and poses a real threat if left lying in the grass. but a leaf-blower isn’t the answer either.  instead, the inventor insists, what humanity needs is a method that is “compatible with the natural body movement of a person.”

enter the ‘leaf chaps’, a pair of zip-on, flexible tubes that slip over pant legs with a net fastened between the two so you can gather leaves as you stroll. the net corrals the leaves and collects them in front of you, so with just a few extra steps, you’re forming piles that are easily picked up later. 

not merely convenient, the chaps also promise to make you more productive. rather than struggle with bulky tools, do something you’d be doing anyway (walking around your lawn), while getting work done! sure, that walk is more like a waddle, but that’s the price you pay for innovation. 

“if you’re not prepared to be wrong,

you’ll never come up with anything original.”

– sir ken robinson

credits: mental floss magazine