Tag Archives: art

funoodler.

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the funoodler,

a food-safe reloadable hot gun that can doodle, draw and design with cheese

For a limited time, the laughing squid store is featuring a great deal on this gem.The Fondoodler is a super simple, food-safe reloadable hot gun that melts most types of string, shredded, block or sheet-style cheese in a cylindrical canister, just like a hot glue gun. This product is available for only $17 – an 43% discount on its original retail price of $30.

FEATURES

  • It’s a hot glue gun for cheese
  • Load it up with pretty much any kind of cheese and splorch away
  • In our tests, Velveeta got too liquidy to work very well, so we recommend just using real cheese
  • Contrary to the repeated protestations of the Cheetos mascot, being cheesy turns out to be very easy indeed
  • The perfect implement for writing entries in your dairy

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Model: Fond 1 as in: “if you can “fond” 1 for less, buy it!”
  • Condition: New
  • Gets cheese-meltingly hot in 3 minutes
  • All the convenience of Easy Cheese but maybe less gross? Jury is out on that one
  • Make your own Leaning Tower of Cheeza
  • Use it with American, Jack, Cheddar, whatever you like
  • String cheese is already the perfect size but shredded, block, or even sheet cheese also works
  • Use it for mortar in your cracker house. It’s Craft Cheese!
  • Dishwasher safe
  • Not for use with chocolate or marshmallows (though if you want to put some chocolate chips or tiny marshmallows in there we can’t stop you)
  • Power: 120V, 60Hz, .8A

Fondoodler: a hot glue gun, but for cheese. A scientific breakthrough to transform the way we live, the way we think, and the way we put cheese on stuff.

 

“the poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.”

  • -gilbert k. chesterton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

credits: laughingsquid.com,lori dorn,

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whimsy.

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Spread across two floors of a regal old 1920s bank building in Astoria, Oregon, this collection is packed with unexpected finds at every turn. It’s a smorgasbord of quirky curiosities, so you never know what treasures or trinkets you’ll come across.

There’s little rhyme or reason to the assortment of oddities. The oldest item, a Native American chair seat made from colored porcupine quills, dates from the 1850s. But the rest of the whimsical wonders are a medley of old and new artifacts from around the world.

You can climb inside a full-sized replica of a British canal narrowboat parked unceremoniously within the old bank building, scan the exhibits for intricate wax boxes, or simply wander the room until you stumble across a piece of vintage clothing or jewelry that sparks your interest.

There are so many things to see, it’s difficult to decide where to start. A striking collection of Folies Bergère dresses and hats immediately catches your eye as you enter—some of the hats even have the name of the dancer who once wore them scrawled inside. Dolls, both daintily beautiful and disturbingly lifelike, are scattered throughout like well-stationed guards. Taxidermy creatures, including a charmingly cute miniature horse, lurk in unexpected places and antique curios hide among newly commissioned works.

The museum is the work of Trish Bright, a retired stockbroker who bought the former bank with her husband in 2005. The curated odds and ends that fill the space are her ever-growing passion project.

“museums are custodians of epiphanies,

and these epiphanies

enter the central nervous system and deep recesses of the mind.”

-george lois

 

 

 

 

credits: museum of whimsy, trish bright, atlas obscura

journey.

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“One day you finally knew what you had to do,

and began, though the voices around you kept shouting their bad advice —

 though the whole house began to tremble

and you felt the old tug at your ankles.

 “Mend my life!” each voice cried.

But you didn’t stop.

You knew what you had to do, though the wind

pried with its stiff fingers at the very foundations

though their melancholy was terrible.

It was already late enough, and a wild night,

and the road full of fallen branches and stones.

But little by little, as you left your voice behind,

the stars began to burn through the sheets of clouds

and there was a new voice which you slowly recognized as your own,

that kept you company as you strode deeper and deeper into the world,

determined to do the only thing you could do —

determined to save the only life that you could save.”

 

credits: papercut by annie howe papercuts, poetry by Mary Oliver – ‘Journey.’

 

where hobbies, hijinks, and capers go bad = my childhood #1

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it began with the arrival of a letter when i was seven years old

with stamp on it that looked different from any i had ever seen

so beautiful and very exotic

and it came from my nana

who lived far away from michigan, in the exotic land of florida.

i thought that it was beautiful

and i decided then and there to become a stamp collector.

i cut that stamp from the envelope and glued it into a notebook.

not long after

i saw an offer to join a monthly stamp collecting club

in my archie comic book

and i noticed, as  i went to send in the offer

 that a parent had to sign it

so i asked my dad to give me his autograph on a piece of scrap paper

cut it out and glued it onto the form

(an early foray into my ill-fated attempts at a criminal career)

added in 99 cents from my piggy bank

and i was off to the races.

i eagerly awaited the day my first stamps would arrive

i had chosen some beauties and i ran home every day

hoping to find them in the mail

and on one glorious day – they were waiting for me!

i tore open the envelope

excitedly looked through them

licked them and placed them in my book

already looking forward to the next month’s arrival.

no one in my family was a collector

so i was taken by surprise when i showed them off to my friend’s older sister

who told me that real collectors only put them in cases

never touch them, and would never, ever lick them

– or they would instantly be made worthless!

i was quite taken aback

as it had never occurred to me that

this would be the reason people collected them

i had thought of them more as a collection of tiny beautiful pictures,

pieces of art, from places far away –

new guinea, finland, new zealand and even the legendary land of  canada

i had chosen flowers, and children, and animals, and pretty designs

with no interest at all in old president’s heads, history, nor with any regard for value.

my version of ‘stamp collecting’ was simply collecting my favorites

and keeping them all in one place, in my special notebook.

i have always loved a mix of patterns and colors and collages of things.

the other thing i had not considered at all

was that i had no income

and would have to continue to pay in order to continue to receive stamps

the next month, when my new set arrived

i gathered more change together, put it in an envelope,

and of course it was never received.

they sent a new batch of stamps along with a due bill and i was panicked

still without any source of income

always waiting for them to show up at the door to tell my parents and to collect.

by the third month,

i simply collected envelopes that came from them

affixed with boring american stamps,

filled with letters, asking me to pay up

and my stamp collecting hobby fell by the wayside.

though i still have a great appreciation for beautiful stamps

and love licking them to put on handwritten letters that i send to places all over the world.

“synonyms for collectable postage stamps: “sticky treasures,”

“collection of paper heads,” “pretty bits of paper,” and “colorful scraps.”

-alan brandley – The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie