Tag Archives: art

the circus arrives.

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to avoid crowds, montreal’s circus festival will pop up in random places

Over the course of this week, some lucky residents in Montreal will be entertained with surprise circus acts that will pop up around the city at undisclosed locations.

The outdoor performances are organized as part of Montreal’s annual circus festival and are taking place from July 6 to 12 at random locations around the city in order to avoid huge crowds from gathering and maintain physical distancing.

As artistic director of Montréal Complètement Cirque, Nadine Marchand explains, a truck called the “Bonheur Mobile” will roll up to alleys, parks, streets, and squares in Saint-Michel, Anjou, St. Henri and the Quartier des Spectacles (to name a few) over the next week.

Ten Quebec circus performers will come rolling out and put on an hour-and-a-half-long show for any unsuspecting Montrealers who happen to be passing by or looking out the window.

Apart from breathing life and joy into the city, the festival has also been organized with the goal of providing work for the artists, as many have been out of work and unable to perform or tour due to the pandemic and it’s not clear when their industry will be back up and running.

Those lucky enough to happen upon one of these surprise performances are asked to stay on their front steps and balconies to avoid getting too close to others.

“the circus arrives without warning.”

-erin morgenstern, the night circus

 

 

 

story credits: marilla steuter- martin, cbc news, daily optimist magazine

bunnyhenge.

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 In the municipal center of Newport Beach, California, sits a local oddity that is equal parts controversial, cuddly, adorable, and absurd.

The sculpture, dubbed “Bunnyhenge,” consists of 14 large white bunnies arranged in a circle, with two even larger 8-foot-tall bunnies found nearby. While these oversized stone bunnies sit stoically staring at each other with their colorful beady eyes, the town around them has become divided over their existence.

When it was first installed in 2013, the sculpture was initially very popular, especially with children (creepy as some others may find a circle of giant bunnies to be). But the public artwork also cost the city $221,000, or nearly $14,000 per bunny, which outraged many residents. One candidate for city council—who was later elected—even declared that “we need to blow up the bunnies!” 

Despite the threats, the bunnies have made it nearly five years, and can still be found strangely and stoically gathered in the park by City Hall.

“read to your bunny often and your bunny will read to you.”

-rosemary wells, american author and illustrator of childrens’ books,

including the ‘max and ruby series’

 

 

credits: leira, atlas obscura

 

a single source.

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Dante Gabriel Rossetti – Washing Hands

 

today the detroit institute of arts

did their part to keep people safe and to aid in their healing.

art helps people in so many unexpected ways

and seems to naturally have that power.

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‘Just as surgeons need to keep a sterile environment for the health of their patients, the DIA’s conservation, collections management, and curatorial teams often use protective equipment to preserve the health of the museum’s artworks. Today, we gathered up those materials — including Tyvek suits, swabs, masks, P95 mask cartridges, wiping cloths and 3,000 nitrile gloves — and delivered them to local hospitals.’ – dia

 

“at the deepest level.

the creative process and the healing process arise from a single source.

when you are an artist,

you are a healer;

a wordless trust of the same mystery

is the foundation of your work and your integrity.”

– dr. rachel naomi remen

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to the poets.

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Wole Soyinka, playwright, poet and Nobel Laureate, reads an original poem written for children at the high-level meeting of the General Assembly on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Celebrating the linguistic expression

of our common humanity

Poetry reaffirms our common humanity by revealing to us that individuals, everywhere in the world, share the same questions and feelings. Poetry is the mainstay of oral tradition and, over centuries, can communicate the innermost values of diverse cultures.

In celebrating World Poetry Day, March 21, UNESCO recognizes the unique ability of poetry to capture the creative spirit of the human mind.

A decision to proclaim March 21 as World Poetry Day was adopted during UNESCO’s 30th session held in Paris in 1999.

One of the main objectives of the Day is to support linguistic diversity through poetic expression and to offer endangered languages the opportunity to be heard within their communities.

The observance of World Poetry Day is also meant to encourage a return to the oral tradition of poetry recitals, to promote the teaching of poetry, to restore a dialogue between poetry and the other arts such as theatre, dance, music and painting, to support small publishers and create an attractive image of poetry in the media, so that the art of poetry will no longer be considered an outdated form of art, but one which enables society as a whole to regain and assert its identity. As poetry continues to bring people together across continents, all are invited to join in.

“poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.”

-robert frost

 

 

 

credits: photo: UN Photo/Mark Garten, UNESCO