Tag Archives: art

glitter again/still.

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i went to the u of m dermo clinic

for my annual skin checkup

and remembered

just how thorough they were

when 3 different docs

checked me out. 

the first one asked,

“did you know that you have some glitter stuck to your back?’

the second one asked,

“how did you get glitter in your hair?”

and finally, the third, the resident doc asked,

“did you know that you have glitter on your feet?”

i think they all imagined that i’d been to a wild party

or secretly am a dancer as my second job

i really couldn’t attribute it to working with the kinders

now that it’s summer break.

i  told all of them that i wasn’t really surprised

that it’s always on me somewhere

thanked them for letting me know

and for another clean bill of health.

i think it lightened things up a bit in their clinic. 

“i must bridge the gap

between adolescent glitter and mature glow.”

-sylvia plath

 

 

 

 

 

image credit: instyle

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melted heart.

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lucky encounter

of a piece of summer’s art –

when crossing paths 

with a melted ice cream heart.

 

 

 

“besides being a useful adjunct to courtship,

ice-cream is often employed to feed poets upon.”

~”A Few Casual Remarks on Ice-Cream,” Puck, 1881 

uphill.

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ann arbor art fair is coming today.

bring it!

“it is easier to go down a hill than up, but the view is from the top.”

-arnold bennett

 

photo credit: ann arbor/scio hill- 1980s,*eck stanger-ann arbor news, aadl archives, ann arbor townies

*Eck Stanger, chief photographer for the Ann Arbor News for 40 years, landed the job because he was the only News employee able to read the German instructions for his secondhand Speed Graphic camera. Or so the legend goes. Over the course of his four decades as photographer – and the News’ sole photographer during its first 12 years–“one-shot Stanger,” as he came to be known–captured famous statesmen, princes, and presidents, as well as eminent artists, musicians, scientists, and athletes. But he spent most of his time capturing everyday Ann Arborites with skill and a keen eye.

frida.

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happy birthday to frida

one of my favorite artists

thanks for keeping the flowers

and everything else you painted,

so alive.

 

“i paint flowers so they will not die.”

-frida kahlo 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

image: the art of knowing, by frida kahlo, angst gallery

the papermaker.

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i have always had a great love of paper

especially handmade

each piece unique

the feel, the smell, the beauty,

 the unlimited opportunities

to decorate it, to write and draw and paint upon it,

to fold it, to cut it, to wrap with it, to read from it, to create with it.

the short film below is a glimpse into the life of an artisan

who is also passionate about paper.

“The Papermaker“ is a short documentary about one of the last handcrafting papermakers in Europe and his great love for paper. Gangolf Ulbricht makes unique tree- free papers by hand. For international artists, conservators, photographers, printers and many more. He learned his uniqe craft in Germany, Japan, France and England. In this short film we see him producing his fine paper in his basement studio in the Arthouse Bethanien in Berlin-Kreuzberg. He talks about his love and dedication for this craft – and it ́s future. Gangolf has worked for a number of known artists like: Jenny Holzer, Louise Bourgeois, Guenther Uecker, Jonathan Meese, Damien Hirst, Christiane Baumgartner, Matthias Weischer and many more.

https://uncrate.com/video/the-papermaker/

“fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.”

-william wordsworth

 

 

 

 

credits:

Directed by DANIEL EGENOLF
Director of Photography LINE KÜHL
Edited by BORIS SEEWALD
Music by RALF HILDENBEUTEL
Sounddesign by ALEXANDER HEINZE
Produced by kingsandkongs.de

funoodler.

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the funoodler,

a food-safe reloadable hot gun that can doodle, draw and design with cheese

For a limited time, the laughing squid store is featuring a great deal on this gem.The Fondoodler is a super simple, food-safe reloadable hot gun that melts most types of string, shredded, block or sheet-style cheese in a cylindrical canister, just like a hot glue gun. This product is available for only $17 – an 43% discount on its original retail price of $30.

FEATURES

  • It’s a hot glue gun for cheese
  • Load it up with pretty much any kind of cheese and splorch away
  • In our tests, Velveeta got too liquidy to work very well, so we recommend just using real cheese
  • Contrary to the repeated protestations of the Cheetos mascot, being cheesy turns out to be very easy indeed
  • The perfect implement for writing entries in your dairy

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Model: Fond 1 as in: “if you can “fond” 1 for less, buy it!”
  • Condition: New
  • Gets cheese-meltingly hot in 3 minutes
  • All the convenience of Easy Cheese but maybe less gross? Jury is out on that one
  • Make your own Leaning Tower of Cheeza
  • Use it with American, Jack, Cheddar, whatever you like
  • String cheese is already the perfect size but shredded, block, or even sheet cheese also works
  • Use it for mortar in your cracker house. It’s Craft Cheese!
  • Dishwasher safe
  • Not for use with chocolate or marshmallows (though if you want to put some chocolate chips or tiny marshmallows in there we can’t stop you)
  • Power: 120V, 60Hz, .8A

Fondoodler: a hot glue gun, but for cheese. A scientific breakthrough to transform the way we live, the way we think, and the way we put cheese on stuff.

 

“the poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.”

  • -gilbert k. chesterton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

credits: laughingsquid.com,lori dorn,

whimsy.

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Spread across two floors of a regal old 1920s bank building in Astoria, Oregon, this collection is packed with unexpected finds at every turn. It’s a smorgasbord of quirky curiosities, so you never know what treasures or trinkets you’ll come across.

There’s little rhyme or reason to the assortment of oddities. The oldest item, a Native American chair seat made from colored porcupine quills, dates from the 1850s. But the rest of the whimsical wonders are a medley of old and new artifacts from around the world.

You can climb inside a full-sized replica of a British canal narrowboat parked unceremoniously within the old bank building, scan the exhibits for intricate wax boxes, or simply wander the room until you stumble across a piece of vintage clothing or jewelry that sparks your interest.

There are so many things to see, it’s difficult to decide where to start. A striking collection of Folies Bergère dresses and hats immediately catches your eye as you enter—some of the hats even have the name of the dancer who once wore them scrawled inside. Dolls, both daintily beautiful and disturbingly lifelike, are scattered throughout like well-stationed guards. Taxidermy creatures, including a charmingly cute miniature horse, lurk in unexpected places and antique curios hide among newly commissioned works.

The museum is the work of Trish Bright, a retired stockbroker who bought the former bank with her husband in 2005. The curated odds and ends that fill the space are her ever-growing passion project.

“museums are custodians of epiphanies,

and these epiphanies

enter the central nervous system and deep recesses of the mind.”

-george lois

 

 

 

 

credits: museum of whimsy, trish bright, atlas obscura