Monthly Archives: March 2020

public image.

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that moment when you realize

that your first imminent all schools faculty webinar is in a zoom format

the next moment

when you pull off an instant makeover

and do the best you can to get your look together

the final moment

when your i.t. person clarifies that it will strictly be

a presentation given by our head of schools

 no one else will be seen on screen

and you feel a certain sense of relief.

You know, there’s nothing you can do about your public image. It is what it is. I just try to do things honestly. I guess honesty is what you would call subjective: if you feel good about what you’re doing, yourself, if you figure you’re doing the right thing.  -Christoper Walken

 

image credits: no corgis were harmed/emotionally scarred in the making of this post,

             all google images

 

marathon man.

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confined by virus, frenchman runs a marathon on  his balcony

 In the age of confinement, Elisha Nochomovitz figured out a way to run a marathon anyway – back and forth on his 23 foot balcony.

That’s right. He ran 42.2 kilometers (26.2 miles) straight, never leaving his 7-meter-long (23-foot) balcony.

He saw it as a physical and mental challenge, but he also shared the images online as a way “to extend my support to the entire medical personnel who are doing an exceptional job. He didn’t exactly make record time. It took him six hours and 48 minutes. He got nauseous, and got worried the neighbors would complain about the pounding of his footsteps. But he did it.

Nochomovitz had been training for a marathon, and said “I needed to assure myself that I could still run 40 kilometers whatever the condition.” He lost track of how many laps he did, but his pedometer kept track while his mind wandered.

“I thought about many things, what’s going to happen, when I see that the world has stopped, sports, economy, finance,” he said. “We learned in history about wars between nations, men and weapons, but this is something that is beyond us.” He especially thought about medics, “the real everyday heroes.”

And he had a key helper. “I had my girlfriend here who was giving me drinks and M&Ms.”

Outside, some onlookers stared in confusion.

And his neighbors? “They were very understanding.”

 

 

“when you run the marathon, you run against the distance,

not against the other runners and not against the time.”

-haile gebrselassie

falling all around.

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 beautiful walk in the rain today

discovering

a newly made waterfall

spring flowers in the mud

brilliant green moss

growing on the trees

in the quiet woods.

 

 

“the rain is falling all around,

it falls on field and tree,

Ii rains on the umbrellas here,

and on the ships at sea.”

-robert louis stevenson, a child’s garden of verses

intermission.

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like our local theater

we will be back

after taking an intermission. 

 

“i lost the plot for a while then. and i lost the subplot, the script,

the soundtrack, the intermission, my popcorn, the credits, and the exit sign.”

Nick Hornby, High Fidelity

 

 

 

 

image credit – ann arbor townies, prashant kuma, michigan theater

of age.

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not me, but someone in my age range with a similar level of enthusiasm

 

on my maiden voyage

into the world of

the senior grocery shopping hour

60 and up’s

i was

looking raggedy

with the

pallor of someone

who’s done hard time served in quarantine

 i was met at the door 

by a customer helper

who wiped down cart handles

as we each took one

in an orderly way

i was happily headed in

when a worker at the self-checkout

shot me a disdainful dirty look

i chalked it up to her being forced to be here under duress

 i shopped

carefully

moving among the others

mindful of age

and

people with less obvious challenges

trying to be happy and friendly

 as i was getting ready to leave

a fellow shopper approached me

saying,

“they really should check i.d. and you know what i mean!!”

it finally hit me 

that both negative reactions 

came in response to them doubting if i was really a senior

 i had to laugh and take it as a compliment

 thought back to my younger days

when i falsely tried to convince people i was ‘of age’

by using my oldest sister’s license as fake i.d.

funny how things change and stay the same. 

 

“none are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm.”

-henry david thoreau

 

 

 

image credit: animal planet

from bored to board.

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Before Professor Plum, Miss Scarlett and Colonel Mustard gathered on a game board to claim their first victim—wielding a revolver, a rope or a lead pipe -British musician Anthony Pratt was watching murder-mystery scenarios unfold in European country mansions, where he played piano. Long before that game board became a global multi-million-seller and was inducted into the Toy Hall of Fame, Pratt was taking mental notes as guests in these elegant homes play-acted dastardly crimes involving skulking, shrieking, and falling ‘dead’ to the floor.

Years later, during World War II, Pratt recreated those murder-mystery parlor games in miniature, as a board game called Murder! (later Clue). The longtime Birmingham resident, who worked in a local munitions factory during the war, invented the suspects and weapons between 1943 and 1945, as a way to pass the long nights stuck indoors during air-raid blackouts. His wife, Elva, assisted, designing it on their dining-room table.

By that time, Pratt had become something of a crime aficionado. HIs daughter Marcia Davies said her father was an avid reader of murder fiction by Raymond Chandler and others. “He was fascinated by the criminal mind,” Davies said of her father. “When I was little he was forever pointing out sites of famous murders to me.”

In 1947, Pratt patented and sold it to a U.K.-based game manufacturer named Waddington’s and its American counterpart, Parker Brothers. But because of post-war shortages the game was not released until 1949—as Cluedo in England and Clue in the United States. In both versions, the object is for players to collect clues to figure out the murder suspect, weapon and location. The game took place in a Victorian mansion. The victim’s name? Mr. Boddy.

Cluedo inventor Anthony Pratt
“is it worse to be scared than to be bored? – that is the question.”
gertrude stein