Tag Archives: language

twitterpated.

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word of the day:  twitterpated

part of speech: adjective

origin: American English, 1940s

  1. infatuated or obsessed
  2. in a state of nervous excitement

 

Examples of twitterpated in a sentence:

“‘Nearly everybody gets twitterpated in the springtime.’ — Bambi (1942)”

“The family is all twitterpated as they pace around the waiting room for the announcement of the new baby.”

 

When was the last time you were twitterpated?

 

 

“words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart.”

-william shakespeare

flowery language.

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today the water flowers spelled out their words in cursive writing

what do you think they were saying?

 

“can we speak in flowers? it will be easier for me to understand.”

-nayyirah waheed, Salt 

 

 

furstenberg park, ann arbor, michigan, usa –  june 2020

to the poets.

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Wole Soyinka, playwright, poet and Nobel Laureate, reads an original poem written for children at the high-level meeting of the General Assembly on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Celebrating the linguistic expression

of our common humanity

Poetry reaffirms our common humanity by revealing to us that individuals, everywhere in the world, share the same questions and feelings. Poetry is the mainstay of oral tradition and, over centuries, can communicate the innermost values of diverse cultures.

In celebrating World Poetry Day, March 21, UNESCO recognizes the unique ability of poetry to capture the creative spirit of the human mind.

A decision to proclaim March 21 as World Poetry Day was adopted during UNESCO’s 30th session held in Paris in 1999.

One of the main objectives of the Day is to support linguistic diversity through poetic expression and to offer endangered languages the opportunity to be heard within their communities.

The observance of World Poetry Day is also meant to encourage a return to the oral tradition of poetry recitals, to promote the teaching of poetry, to restore a dialogue between poetry and the other arts such as theatre, dance, music and painting, to support small publishers and create an attractive image of poetry in the media, so that the art of poetry will no longer be considered an outdated form of art, but one which enables society as a whole to regain and assert its identity. As poetry continues to bring people together across continents, all are invited to join in.

“poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.”

-robert frost

 

 

 

credits: photo: UN Photo/Mark Garten, UNESCO

grandiloquent.

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we all know that person

who uses pretentious words as a means to impress

which generally results in the opposite effect

like when someone uses the word ‘grandiloquent’ in a sentence.

GRANDILOQUENT

part of speech: adjective

origin: latin, late 16th century

definition:

speaking or expressed in a lofty style, often to the point of being pompous or bombastic.

related words:

sentence examples:

Even though Rick did not understand the grandiloquent words, he still used them to impress his wealthy friends. 

When I heard the salesman’s grandiloquent speech, I knew he was trying to make the car deal sound better than it actually was.

 

“i am trying to impress myself. i have yet to do it.”

-shia labeouf

treasure house.

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in 1852 Roget published his thesaurus, a word that means ‘treasure house’ in greek. 

 JANUARY 18: NATIONAL THESAURUS DAY

British lexicographer Peter Mark Roget—who is most famous for publishing The Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (a.k.a. Roget’s Thesaurus) in 1852—was born on January 18, 1779. As such, this is a day to honor, celebrate, extol, laud, praise, revere, salute, etc. his contributions.

“the man is not wholly evil, he has a thesaurus in his cabin.”

– j.m. barrie, author of Peter Pan, describing the character Captain Hook. 

Personal note:

I am a huge fan of alphabets, words, and more words, in all languages

the thesaurus is one of my favorite books

and it is indeed a treasure house.

image credit: the right word, Roget and his thesaurus by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet