Tag Archives: story

unusually.

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why, you might ask, is this large ceramic cat sitting in the water?

while visiting my friend’s house

i asked.

years ago

someone in the family took a ceramics class

made several large animals

gifted them to his children

who gifted them to each other

left them at each others’ houses

 used them in a variety of ways

including an outdoor towel holder

somehow over time

this one went to live in the water

looking back at the family on the shore

probably thinking the family was unusual

wondering their story

there is always a story.

 

“we are not interested in the unusual, but in the usual seen unusually.”     

-beaumont newhall

a different kind.

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this tiny dog

has lived a full life

gifted to me by my dear friend

having once

belonged to

her husband’s mother/grandmother

i would love to know its story

it has seen the world and is beautifully imperfect.

 

“art is something that makes you breathe with a different kind of happiness.”

~ Anni Albers

tell their stories.

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after sledding on a beautiful snow day

grandies and neighbors

gather around the table

to share a large pot

of ramen, laughs, and stories. 

“honor the community you come from. tell their stories.”

-sting

 

the tipping point.

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saw this in the early morning when walking downtown 

I wonder about the story behind how it got there

was it a server at his/her limit

 finally reaching the tipping point

throwing down the apron 

tying them down

abandoning ship

hoping for

something better/different/new out there?

‘a single act of courage is often the tipping point for extraordinary change.’

-andy stanley

storybook trail.

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such a wonderful discovery made

when walking in a park near my daughter’s house

an illustrated storybook trail

with pages spread throughout the woods

placed there by the village and the local library

a perfect pairing.

“we tell stories in order to feel at home in the universe.”
— Roger Bingham, British science communicator, writer, public television producer and host

wondering.

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after walking up to this truck

i wondered about all the stories it could tell

where it’s been, who it carried, what happened

no one knows for sure

all that’s left is to imagine.

what a ride it must have been!

“i like stories that leave you wanting more,

leave you wondering, but don’t tell you everything.”

-viggo mortensen

 

ann arbor – summer 2018

same hero, different season.

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in much the same way

that he appeared out of the blue

in the midst of a very heavy snow season

to ask if i would hire him to shovel my driveway

and disappearing just as suddenly

only to appear again

last weekend

wheeling his mower down the sidewalk

and stopping by

to ask if i would hire him to mow my lawn

soon after my lawn mower refused to start

the quiet, polite, hardworking kid with no name is back 

and gone again.

“everybody is a hero in their own story if you just look.”

-maeve binchy

 

 

image credit: pincor products vintage advertising

eat like a genius.

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The Grocery List Sketched by Michelangelo
You can’t sculpt like Michelangelo, but you can eat like him.

In March 1518, Michelangelo feasted on fish and bread. 

ACCORDING TO MICHELANGELO’S SHOPPING LIST, genius thrives on a diet of fish, bread, and lots of wine.

Owned by the Casa Buonarroti museum in Florence, Italy, this 500-year-old list was written and illustrated by the sculptor/painter/poet/personality on the back of a letter. Michelangelo’s servant was likely illiterate, so Michelangelo sketched out what he wanted to eat.

And Michelangelo wanted a feast, spread out over three meals. He depicted bread rolls as quickly-drawn circles, and for one meal, Michelangelo wanted two rolls. For another, he wanted six. On the page, an elegant herring floats in the air, while bowls overflow with salad and anchovies. Two dishes of stewed fennel are sketched side by side, and when asking for a smaller amount of dry wine, Michelangelo carefully drew a small wine jug next to a larger one. Sadly, he did not draw two plates of tortelli—he only asked for the ravioli-like pasta pouches in writing.

The menu consists mostly of vegetables, fish, wine, and bread. This might seem particularly healthy, but the letter on the other side of the list is dated March 18, 1518, around the time of Lent. Since eating meat was frowned upon, Michelangelo ate the requisite vegetables. However, Gillian Riley writes in The Oxford Guide to Italian Food that this was definitely an upscale menu. Despite his frugal reputation, the artist was probably used to dining with nobility.

By 1518, Michelangelo had already finished many of his most famous works, including the Pietà, the David, and the Sistine Chapel ceiling. But among all his work, this rough list is perhaps the most down-to-earth glimpse of the artist himself. It’s interesting to imagine the famously mercurial Michelangelo taking the time to illustrate for his servant what he wanted for dinner.

The survival of this list is remarkable, too. Only around 600 of Michelangelo’s sketches still exist. 1518 marked the year that Michelangelo burned many of his early drawings, and 46 years later, he ordered many of his papers to be torched in anticipation of his death. Maybe he wanted to preserve the aura of divine genius that surrounded his art. A list showing his sketched takeout order might not have given the right impression.

 

“all writing is an act of self-exploration.

even a grocery list says something about you;

how much more does a novel say?”

-steven saylor

 

 

 

credits: atlas obscura/gastro obscura, anne ewebank,Casa Buonarroti- Florence, Italy

journos.

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“ann arbor news reporter stan bradshaw

leaves building front door for assignment, september 1948″.


this old news image reflects the one we often had of intrepid reporters, hot on an assignment, giving us the latest news of pinnacle events in the life of ann arbor. there was a certain quality and reliability to the news and its staff, bringing us the best stories and photographs available. the photos still resonate with the innocence and spontaneity of life and those living it here.

“journalism keeps you planted in the earth.”

-ray bradbury

to all the journos out there, still finding a way to tell the story.

 

 

 

 

 

image credits: oldnews.aadl.org, ann arbor townies