Tag Archives: science

think pink.

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Today in animals you might not believe are real (but are!): the pink fairy armadillo. This species (Chlamyphorus truncatus) grows to just about 6 inches long, making them the smallest armadillos in the world.

They are found only in central Argentina, and because they’re nocturnal and spend a lot of time burrowing underground, the elusive creatures are difficult to study. 

Like other armadillos, pink fairy armadillos have a shell (or carapace) but theirs is softer, thinner and more flexible. The shell’s color comes from blood vessels close to the surface.

source credit: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

“always be yourself unless you can be an armadillo,

then always be an armadillo.”

-author unknown

some animals are so unusual, it’s hard to believe they’re real.

what’s the most interesting/unusual animal you’ve ever encountered?

butterflies are free.

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after one final close look 

at the butterflies we raised

it’s time to release them back into nature

where they quickly find their wings. 

 

“the butterfly counts not months but moments, and has time enough.”

-rabindranath tagore

tulips.

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*”tulips are the only flowers that continue to grow, up to an inch or more, after they’re cut.”

-sarah jio

 

i find it fascinating that they refuse to surrender so easily

even defiantly growing longer 

and,

there’s science.

 

*Tulip stems do continue to lengthen once they’re snipped. That’s because the cells in their stems are particularly responsive to the plant hormone auxin, which causes them to elongate. Auxin also influences phototropism — the tendency of plants to grow toward light. – google

 

art credit: watercolor by vadim 

the music of spiders.

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spider music

The humble spider has always been well represented in the musical world, from Ziggy Stardust to the Who and Wilco. For too long, though, we’ve refused to let them relate their experiences to us more directly. That’s now changed, thanks to the work of scientists who are turning spiders’ vibration-based perceptions into music.

Vice recently profiled the work of MIT engineering professor Markus Buehler, who leads a team that’s working to translate web vibrations into sounds we can actually hear. The project uses “the physics of spiderwebs to assign audible tones to a given string’s unique tension and vibration” through a process called data sonification.

The resulting models can be explored through virtual reality software or listened to via examples recorded by Buehler and his collaborator Tomas Saraceno. The music created by manipulating the models is incredible—an eerie approximation of how spiders understand their environments.

Buehler says that the project’s goal is both to “expand how we generate sound in music and how we compose music” and to practically demonstrate how “for something like a spider, there’s a whole different way of experiencing the world.”

“Researchers say the project could eventually be used to reverse engineer spiders’ reality and communicate with the arachnids,” Vice explains, somewhat ominously. Buehler elaborates, saying that he’s planning to play AI-generated spider sounds to the creatures and “gauge [their] reactions.”

For more on Markus Buehler And The Spiders From Earth, read the full article.

 

“is there anything more beautiful and protective than the simple complexity of a spider’s web?”

-e.b. white, Charlotte’s Web

 

 

 

source credits: Reid McCarter, Michelle Bender, Vice

snowball.

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our class has been taking a close look at snow and ice

after reading them

the first book i ever read all by myself 

‘snow’ by p.d. eastman

 brought a snowball in from outside

named it ned

popped it in our freezer

 check on it every now and then

take ned out for just a little bit

see if it’s still cold and in the shape of a snowball and if it’s drippy

 hope that ned will be with us throughout the season

even if he goes away in the spring

 we’re pretty sure he’ll be back next winter.

crystals.

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a collection of treasured magic crystals found a frosty playground

 

“every particular in nature, a leaf, a drop, a crystal,

a moment of time is related to the whole, 

and partakes of the perfection of the whole.”

-ralph waldo emerson