Tag Archives: celebration

oldies.

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happy i’m still around and sweatin’ with the rest of the michigan oldies – one more special day to celebrate

Header 2021

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 20, 2021

Governor Whitmer proclaims August 21 as Older Michigander Day

LANSING, Mich. – Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, in partnership with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), is celebrating the state’s more than 2.4 million adults aged 60 years and older by proclaiming Aug. 21 as Older Michigander Day.

 

“the great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been.”

-Madeleine L’Engle

low key.

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this year’s celebration is just going to be a low key affair

how will you be welcoming in the new year?

 

“embrace curiosity, be open, playful, and persistent.”

-Debra Kaye, Red Thread Thinking: Weaving Together Connections 

 

 

 

 

 

image credit: pinterest vintage images, the pickle sisters vaudeville troupe, 1920s

eve eve.

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in talking with the grandies

about all the excitement leading up to christmas eve

i soon realized

that i was even excited for the eve before that eve

because i know what comes next

and it just grows from there.

“I like to compare the holiday season with the way a child listens to a favorite story. The pleasure is in the familiar way the story begins, the anticipation of familiar turns it takes, the familiar moments of suspense, and the familiar climax and ending.”

– Fred Rogers

cookie, cookie, cookie.

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“happiness isn’t a fortune in a cookie. it’s deeper, wider, funnier, and more transporting than that.”

-elvis costello

 NATIONAL COOKIE DAY – December 4

The English word “cookie” is derived from the Dutch word koekie, meaning “little cake.”

Hard cookie-like wafers have existed for as long as baking has been documented. Not surprisingly, they traveled well, too, though were usually not sweet enough to be considered cookies by modern-day standards.

The origin of the cookie appears to begin in Persia in the 7th century, soon after the use of sugar became common in the region. They then spread to Europe through the Muslim conquest of Spain. Cookies were common at all levels of society throughout Europe by the 14th century, from the royal cuisine to the street vendors.

Cookies arrived in America in the 17th century. Macaroons and gingerbread cookies were among the popular early American cookies. In most English-speaking countries outside of North America, the most common word for cookie is “biscuit.”  In some regions, both terms, cookies, and biscuits are used.

HOW TO OBSERVE NationalCookieDay

Pick up some cookies at your local bakery and remember to share them with family and friends. Or – make a list of your favorite cookies to bake and enjoy. Organize your baking tools and start your assembly line. Taste as you go.

NATIONAL COOKIE DAY HISTORY

In 1976, Sesame Street included National Cookie Day on its calendar for the first time. Cookie Monster also proclaimed his own National Cookie Day in the 1980 book The Sesame Street Dictionary. Then in 1987, Matt Nader of the Blue Chip Cookie Company created Cookie Day, celebrating it on December 4th.