Tag Archives: books

nancy at 90ish.

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Happy 92nd birthday to Nancy Drew! The first volume in the long-running girl detective series, “The Secret of the Old Clock,” was published 92 years ago under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene. In a tribute to the iconic sleuth, author Theodore Jefferson writes, “Agency. It is that which forms the foundation for any hero’s ability to save the day. In America, agency for teenage girls in literature made its debut in 1930 in the person of Nancy Drew.” This original Mighty Girl character paved the way for many more heroic female characters and inspired generations of real-life girls and women.

Ghostwritten by Mildred Wirt Benson and later revised by Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, the first volume of Nancy Drew had a huge influence on young readers. Nancy Drew provided them with “stories of someone like themselves who had a positive effect on the world instead of passively sitting at home… She is a character with that magical ‘what if’ question woven into her identity, and one that effortlessly captures the imaginations of readers by allowing them to participate in a world where the answers to that question are just as entertaining as the stories themselves.”

At the time, some viewed Nancy Drew as a poor role model, “contradicting adults while she squared off with the villains… she is mechanically inclined and at the same time doesn’t act like most people in the 1930s would have expected a teenage girl to act.” In fact, many libraries and bookstores refused to carry the Nancy Drew stories. Despite — or because of — that disapproval, kids collected the books voraciously, and in the midst of the Depression, used copies were shared and traded like trading cards are today. As a result, “any kid, even those who couldn’t afford new books, would very likely get to read every adventure starring their favorite character.”

The tremendous influence of Nancy Drew continues to this day asserts Jefferson: “It is difficult to overstate how powerful Nancy Drew’s presence remains in literature and in other media. She has influenced film, comics, video games and animation for [90] years, and will continue to do so as long as teenage girls take the lead as our heroes in the imaginative worlds of adventure.”

i loved this book series and it inspired me to be part of a neighborhood gang of childhood detectives

(the four crows – see my post below)

and i am still a huge fan of true crime, not as a criminal,

but in trying to solve the who’s, why’s, and how’s.

https://ididnthavemyglasseson.com/?s=four+crows

On leaving work, at work…

“I don’t promise to forget the mystery, but I know I’ll have a marvelous time.”

-nancy drew

 

credits: theodore jefferson, the mary sue, mighty girl

mrs. ticklefeather is missing.

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as a collector of the classic golden books

i am endlessly fascinated

by their history, artwork, authors, short tales, and backstories

i finally found and ordered one i’d been looking for

“lucky mrs. ticklefeather”

which seems to have quickly made it’s way through multiple cities

only to land in detroit a few weeks ago

where is has remained

stuck in an ‘in transit’ status

ever since its arrival.

will *mrs. ticklefeather ever be found?

is she still considered lucky?

is there a rival golden book collector near me

looking for the same book?

does paul her pet puffin, have anything to do with this?

it remains to be seen and i remain hopeful

this story isn’t over yet. 

*Book summary – Rare ~~ Mrs. Ticklefeather was a very thin old lady with a good sized feather in her hat, and on her feet she had tall black shoes with plenty of buttons. She lived on the top floor of a terribly high building because the top floor is the best place for getting sunshine, and, Oh, what a good thing sunshine is for thin old ladies. When her pet puffin, Paul, goes missing, the elderly Mrs. Ticklefeather becomes very upset, but the next day Paul returns and brings with him a special gift that brings her great and unexpected happiness. Great illustrations in mid- century yet modern style.

“hope is the last thing ever lost.”

italian proverb

summer reading.

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(not me, just someone who also loves summer reading, but probably does not nod off like i do)

“here is this delicious book and the whole day, both yours.”

the true pleasure or summer reading lies not so much in the novel itself, the writer hildegarde hawthorne explained in 1907, but the choice to devote oneself to it. summer reading as we now know it emerged in the u.s. in the. mid-1800s, buoyed by an emerging middle class and the birth of another cultural tradition: the summer vacation.

 

Art credit: Couch on the Porch, Cos Cob, Frederick Childe Hassam, 1914

when books fly.

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thanks to artist david zinn, for his lovely sidewalk chalk ode to the library 

the day has arrived at last

the library has reopened

after what seemed like such a long, long time

our community couldn’t be happier

it has been so greatly missed by so many. 

‘Libraries: The medicine chest of the soul.’

—Library at Thebes, inscription over the door

the magic of books.

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“i believe in the magic of books.

i believe that during certain periods in our lives we are drawn to particular books-

whether it’s strolling down the aisles of a bookshop

with no idea whatsoever of what it is that we to want read

and suddenly finding the most perfect, most wonderfully suitable book staring us right in the face.

unblinking.

or a chance meeting with a stranger or friend

who recommends a book we would never ordinarily reach for.

books have the ability to find their own way into our lives. “

-cecelia ahern

 

has this happened to you?

image credit: min heo

the price is right.

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my colleague recently ordered a book online for her classroom

 then added a second book

because it was such a deal at the great price of $2.50.

when her order arrived, she only saw one book

until upon further inspection

she discovered

much to her surprise

sitting in the corner of the box

the $2.50 book

which was actually a miniature edition

 while it was technically a book

 it was perhaps better sized for the fairy world

though still a good deal

as we definitely had more than $2.50 worth of laughs.

“the best things in life are free – and $19.95”

-billy mays

 

book fairies.

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how sweet to find this book 

 sitting outside on the window ledge of a downtown store  

on a sunny saturday

just waiting for someone

to pick it up and take it home to read. 

gratitude to the book fairies.

“books are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind. books are humanity in print.”

-barbara w. tuchman

common ground.

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my class has recently become enamored with a giant box of dinos

they play with them every day

create wildly imaginative scenarios

ask questions about real dinos

reassure me that the ones in our room are not real

one day when playing, a child asked

“would they wear masks if they were alive now?”

another jumped up to say

“never, ever, ever, ever, try to put a mask on a t-rex!!!!”

and an instant class book was born

what a brilliant title

others jumped in to offer reasons why you shouldn’t try to mask one

brainstorming was in full swing

some became illustrators

 it is a fascinating and funny work in progress.

dinos may have left the earth forever, but books will never die.

“stories are the common ground that allow people to connect, despite all our defenses and all our differences.”

-kate forsyth

writing desk.

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what you might imagine it to be vs. what it might quite possibly be.

 

i recently listened to this book written and read by stephen king, and loved every minute of it-

a mix of his personal story and very straight shooting practical advice.

“It starts with this: put your desk in the corner, and every time you sit down there to write,

remind yourself why it isn’t in the middle of the room.

Life isn’t a support system for art. It’s the other way around.”

Stephen King

Amazon book review summary: Short and snappy as it is, Stephen King’s On Writing really contains two books: a fondly sardonic autobiography and a tough-love lesson for aspiring novelists.

 

image credits: tom gauld, simon and schuster