Monthly Archives: April 2018

badger

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Part of castle closed off due to ‘very angry badger’

The guest was found in the cellar tunnel at Craignethan Castle, South Lanarkshire. The cellar tunnel was shut at around midday on Thursday after staff discovered the unexpected guest. It is thought the animal may have become lost and staff have been trying to lure him out with cat food and honey. The rest of the castle, in South Lanarkshire, remains open to visitors.

Historic Scotland told visitors about the unusual resident in a tweet, saying: “If you’re heading to Craignethan Castle over the next few days you might find the cellar tunnel closed due to the presence of a very angry badger.”We’re trying to entice it out with cat food and send it home to chill out.”

Craignethan Castle: Site is a Historic Scotland property

Staff first spotted some dug-out earth on Wednesday evening, and later spotted the badger on closer inspection. The animal is said to have caused some mess, digging up through loose soil into stonework, and staff have been clearing away the rubble.

The Historic Scotland property, managed by Historic Environment Scotland (HES), was built around 1530 and has a tower house, ramparts and caponier – a stone-vaulted shooting gallery.

“step aside? i step aside for no beast,

whether it be a hallowed hedgehog,

an officious otter, a seasoned squirrel,

a mutterin’ mole, or a befuddled badger!”

– brian jacques (redwall series)

 credits: STV News -scotland, british medieval history, historic environment scotland

where hobbies, hijinks, and capers go bad = my childhood #3

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when i sent in yet another dollar

for yet another mail-in adventure 

i was very excited and waiting to play

with my 100 international dolls

expecting them to look like the dolls below

all in fancy and exotic dress

and ready for me to proudly display

 when they arrived

they were tiny, pink plastic, flat dolls without any outfits at all

and actually looked like the ones in the comic book ad

not sure why i had such big visions about them

but even then

that was how

i made my way through the world

always hopeful, expecting good things, and full of possibility.

 

“for me, a life without expectation results in a life with inspiration.”

-alanis morissette

hidden.

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A small horde of mythical creatures lurk almost imperceptibly within the museum’s wildlife dioramas.

Back in the 1970s, the Denver Museum of Nature and Science hired artist Kent Pendleton to paint the backdrops for many of the museum’s wildlife dioramas. Little did it know that Pendleton’s penchant for hiding tiny mythical creatures in these paintings would add a whole new dimension to the museum experience.

It all began with eight elves—or gnomes, or leprechauns, depending who you ask—hidden in Pendleton’s wildlife dioramas. An elf hiding in the lowland river. An elf riding a dinosaur along a cretaceous creekbed. Another elf sat on a rock in the Great Smoky Mountains. And others, hard to spot but definitely there, in various backdrops throughout the museum.

When these eagle-eyed volunteers began to spot the museum’s incongruous and thoroughly unscientific inhabitants, the whole thing began to snowball. The staff decided to go along with the game, adding more elves and gnomes to the museum. A ceramic elf, for example, found his way onto the Candor Chasma of Mars. And now a digital elf exists in the entrance video, cleverly concealed within a cluster of stars.

The fantasy easter eggs diversified, too; there are angels, unicorns, even a Millennium Falcon and a tiny Yoda hidden in the museum. Precisely how many creatures are hidden around the museum is an open question. The museum’s official elf scavenger-hunt guide currently lists nine. But Maura O’Neal, the museum’s communications and media relations manager, says there are about double that amount.

So even if you do go on the scavenger hunt, guide in hand, you’ll never quite know when you might spot an undocumented elf lurking somewhere, surreptitiously, in the Denver museum…