Tag Archives: magic

story about the stories.

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on this special day

i brought out

an old treasured story 

written by

my former student, nicole

who i taught for grades k-2

(in a school where we were known by our first names)

 a story about me sharing stories

 made me cry happy tears to read

how much she enjoyed the stories

what ginormous heaps of praise

from a fellow roald dahl fan. 

happy roald dahl story day!!

“words are our most inexhaustible source of magic.”

-albus dumbledore (j.k. rowling, harry potter series)

magic spell.

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 “expecto petronum”

“dear miss kennedy, i know this spell. if you do that magic it just keeps you safe from stuff if you are in danger.”

– from my student, l.

one of kindest and most wonderful gifts i’ve ever received 

“kindness is a magical spell –

performed by enlightened beings –

meant to enchant hearts and lift weary souls that they might fly.”

-richelle e. goodrich

magic all around you.

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One hundred years ago this month, the magician P.T. Selbit ushered his assistant into an upright wooden box, sealed it, laid it flat, and got down to business, sawing the box right down the middle. The show, according to magic experts, was the first time a performer ever sawed someone in half. Why has this trick survived, when so many others haven’t? If you ask magicians, NYT writer Alex Marshall spoke with six — they eventually land on one answer. “It’s just the simplicity of it,” said Mike Caveney, a magician who’s writing a history of this trick. “Magicians say a good trick is one that can be described in a few words, and ‘sawing a lady in half’ is very few words,” he added. As for being the assistant, “When you’re doing it you’re not a passive person,” one magician said. “It’s claustrophobic, and quite noisy, but such fun!”

” i believe your reality is what you make it, what you choose to see, and what you choose to allow yourself to do.

there are possibilities all around you – magic all around you – no matter what situation you’re in.”

-keke palmer

Story credit: Alex Marshall, NYT- Image credit: Nolan Pellitier

 

crystals.

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a collection of treasured magic crystals found a frosty playground

 

“every particular in nature, a leaf, a drop, a crystal,

a moment of time is related to the whole, 

and partakes of the perfection of the whole.”

-ralph waldo emerson

talking heads.

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*LEARN AND PRACTICE VENTRILOQUISM AND PUPPET SKILLS!

(*This offer recently popped up on my local Meetup Group feed, inviting me to join. It would be one of my worst nightmares. Hopefully, the puppets don’t know where I live.)

‘This group is for anyone who wants to learn to do ventriloquism. After buying a puppet and learning to do ventriloquism, I decided to form this group.We will go through all the basics. I have a guide that will help us and we will follow the lessons. I will only use the skills from the best ventriloquists in the country. This group is something that I have wanted to get together for a long time. This group is open to the public. ‘

noooooooooooooo……..

“here’s something you never hear:

now that i’ve worked through all my emotional issues,

i’m free to dedicate my life to ventriloquism!”

– dana gould

 

 

 

image credits: google images

 

hidden.

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A small horde of mythical creatures lurk almost imperceptibly within the museum’s wildlife dioramas.

Back in the 1970s, the Denver Museum of Nature and Science hired artist Kent Pendleton to paint the backdrops for many of the museum’s wildlife dioramas. Little did it know that Pendleton’s penchant for hiding tiny mythical creatures in these paintings would add a whole new dimension to the museum experience.

It all began with eight elves—or gnomes, or leprechauns, depending who you ask—hidden in Pendleton’s wildlife dioramas. An elf hiding in the lowland river. An elf riding a dinosaur along a cretaceous creekbed. Another elf sat on a rock in the Great Smoky Mountains. And others, hard to spot but definitely there, in various backdrops throughout the museum.

When these eagle-eyed volunteers began to spot the museum’s incongruous and thoroughly unscientific inhabitants, the whole thing began to snowball. The staff decided to go along with the game, adding more elves and gnomes to the museum. A ceramic elf, for example, found his way onto the Candor Chasma of Mars. And now a digital elf exists in the entrance video, cleverly concealed within a cluster of stars.

The fantasy easter eggs diversified, too; there are angels, unicorns, even a Millennium Falcon and a tiny Yoda hidden in the museum. Precisely how many creatures are hidden around the museum is an open question. The museum’s official elf scavenger-hunt guide currently lists nine. But Maura O’Neal, the museum’s communications and media relations manager, says there are about double that amount.

So even if you do go on the scavenger hunt, guide in hand, you’ll never quite know when you might spot an undocumented elf lurking somewhere, surreptitiously, in the Denver museum…