Tag Archives: writing

scribbles, scraps, and scrawls.

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 anyone who works with me, is related to me, or friends with me

knows i love writing my ideas/notes/lists

on any random found piece of paper 

 all makes perfect sense to me 

interesting to look back at later

when out of context and a bit of time has gone by.

 

“but those who cannot write, and those who can, all rhyme, and scrawl, and scribble to a man.”

-alexander pope

 

 

note: (photo above is an “S” page ( S is for: scribbles, scraps and scrawls)

from a work-in progress – my memoir,

done in a large-format, alphabet book style,

using a bajillion collage pieces cut from everywhere – the best way i know to tell my story.)

lwd. (laughing while driving.) is this a ticket-able offense?

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The Patron Saint of Second Chances

 a debut novel by Christine Simon

on my weekday commutes to school

i listen to quite a few books

and this

was the first one in a long time

that had me laughing out loud while driving

while i may have looked a bit crazy

 it was so worth it for the belly laughs

all from this book

set in a small italian village

filled with larger than life, passionate, eccentric characters

who you will absolutely fall in love with

a community who finds a way

where no path is clear

using the power of optimism, love, and fate

(along with a few pleas to obscure patron saints)

to overcome all obstacles.

you simply will not want this beautiful story to end.

 bella.

“my optimism wears heavy boots and is loud.”

-henry rollins

 

 

image credit/publisher: atria books

story about the stories.

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on this special day

i brought out

an old treasured story 

written by

my former student, nicole

who i taught for grades k-2

(in a school where we were known by our first names)

 a story about me sharing stories

 made me cry happy tears to read

how much she enjoyed the stories

what ginormous heaps of praise

from a fellow roald dahl fan. 

happy roald dahl story day!!

“words are our most inexhaustible source of magic.”

-albus dumbledore (j.k. rowling, harry potter series)

old news.

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as a lover of the printed page

i still happily await the arrival

of each sunday’s newspaper

on my doorstep

in spite of

sadly seeing this

 far too often.

“every day or two, I strolled to the village to hear some of the gossip which is incessantly going on there,

circulating either from mouth to mouth, or from newspaper to newspaper,

and which, taken in homeopathic doses,

was really as refreshing in its way as the rustle of leaves and the peeping of frogs.”

-henry david thoreau

hard wood.

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the class discovered this tree with magical writing all over it
and even though he’s only mastered the alphabet this year
‘a’ chose to read it out loud to everyone
in his own magical language
a master translator at work.
“he was made of hard wood.”
-hungarian proverb
Arborglyphs, dendroglyphs, silvaglyphs or modified cultural trees
is the carving of shapes and symbols into the bark of living trees.

erased.

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Happy Birthday to the Modern Pencil

Was sticking an eraser on the back of a pencil common sense, or a new invention? This week in 1868, Philadelphia stationery store owner H.L. Lipman patented something that seems incredibly obvious in hindsight: a regular pencil, with an eraser on the end.

Although Lipman is credited with this innovation, his pencil with eraser looked a little different than its modern descendant. Rather than being glued onto the end, Lipman envisioned a pencil with a chunk of rubber eraser in the core that could be accessed by sharpening it, the same way you would a pencil lead.

Graphite pencils had been around since the 1500s, writes David Green for Haaretz. But until the 1770s, the preferred tool used to erase pencil marks was balled-up bread.

Lipman’s name hasn’t gone down in history, maybe because he didn’t manage to hold on to his patent. After gaining it, he sold it to Joseph Reckendorfer in 1862 for about $2 million in today’s money. Reckendorfer also didn’t get much use out of the patent. He took another company to court over their use of his patent, only for it to be invalidated by the court’s decision, which stated that Lipman merely combined two existing things, but didn’t really produce something new.

Lipman essentially imagined the pencil as having a graphite end and a rubber eraser end.

“It may be more convenient to turn over the different ends of the same stick than to lay down one stick and take up another,” the decision noted. “This, however, is not invention within the patent law.”

Over his career, though, Lipman also made a number of contributions to the 19th-century office:

He was also America’s first envelope manufacturer, and it was he who had the idea of adding adhesive to the back flap, so as to make sealing easier. He devised a methods for binding papers with an eyelet that preceded the stapler by two decades. And Lipman was the first to produce and sell blank postcards in the United States, in 1873.

Pencils aren’t really a notable object, writes Henry Petroski in The Pencil: A History of Design and Circumstance, but they shape how people do their work. Unlike the pen, a more permanent writing instrument, the pencil doesn’t usually get sayings (it’s the pen that’s mightier than the sword, for example) or a lot of credit. But pencil is an essential creative medium, he writes, because it can be erased—as everyone from architects to artists can tell you.

“Ink is the cosmetic that ideas will wear when they go out in public,” he writes. “Graphite is their dirty truth.”

credits: kat eschner, smithsonian.com, smithsonian magazine

pencil.

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a pencil can write 45,000 words

 

if you have some time on your hands, maybe give this fact a try. according to reports, the average pencil can write roughly 45,000 words and draw a line that is 38 miles long (61.2 km) long. what’s for sure, you’ll need a few stacks of paper on hand to try this one out. as a huge fan of writing utensils, this is very exciting news!

 

“a pencil and a dream can take you anywhere.”

-joyce meyer

 

 

 

source credits: getty images, mental floss

 

breathings.

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the long letter

written on the outside of my valentine

was even more important

than the card inside

 the kinder who worked very hard to write it all down

read it out loud to me

confident, proud, with voice inflections, hands moving

and so much to say.

“fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.”

-william wordsworth

qwerty.

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not me, but someone from back in the day 
who is frustrated by the illogical order of the keyboard.

have you ever wondered why the letters on the keyboard are organized the way they are? while it seems like the letters were randomly strewn across the keys, this method of organizing the keyboard was developed as way to slow down typists. back in 1872, typewriter users were typing too fast and causing the typewriters to jam. so, the QWERTY method actually kept the machines from breaking down and is still used today.

 

“wisely and slow; they stumble that run fast. ”    

-william shakespeare

 

 

source: mental floss, noam

 

what?! a follow-up to my exciting ‘huh’ post?!

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Because sometimes periods, commas, colons, semi-colons, dashes, hyphens, apostrophes, question marks, exclamation points, quotation marks, brackets, parentheses, braces, and ellipses won’t do, here is another punctuation mark to work into your everyday communications:

INTERROBANG

You probably already know the interrobang, thanks to its popularity (You did what!?). Though the combination exclamation point and question mark can be replaced by using one of each, they can also be combined into a single glyph. The interrobang was invented by advertising executive Martin Speckter in 1962, who said “it is the typographical equivalent of a grimace or a shrug of the shoulders. It applied solely to the rhetorical, when a writer wished to convey incredulity.” The name is derived from the Latin word interrogatio, which means “questioning,” and bang—how printers refer to the exclamation mark.

“symbols are nothing but the natural speech of drama”
-tennessee williams
source: mental flosss
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