Tag Archives: words

wobbly.

Standard

when i stopped by my favorite coney island restaurant to pick up a giant greek salad

(in detroit, coney dogs and greek food under one roof are a restaurant tradition)

something on their monday special sign stuck out

while the words ‘coney island’ were displayed on 3 signs all around it

and coney island is a part of the restaurant’s name

the special somehow became ‘cony‘ dog monday.

i know how hard it is to be your own editor

and i am easily amused

but it just struck me as really funny

that no one noticed

 it’s the most popular item they sell.

“my spelling is wobbly. it’s good spelling but it wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places.”

-A. A. Milne

the history of how you felt.

Standard

 loving my new journals and so looking forward to filling them

 

“language allows us to reach out to people, to touch them with our innermost fears, hopes, disappointments, victories.

to reach out to people we’ll never meet.

it’s the greatest legacy you could ever leave your children or your loved ones:

the history of how you felt.”

-simon van booy

 

nursery rhymes.

Standard

“read to your children all of the time

novels and nursery rhymes

autobiographies, even the newspaper

it doesn’t matter; it’s quality time

because once upon a time

we grew up on stories in the voices in which they were told

we need words to hold us and the world to behold us

for us to truly know our souls.”

-taylor mali

in honor of world nursery rhyme week

 

 

 

 

image credit: 1930s vintage etsy art

commonplace.

Standard

wonder what the deadline on this project is?

so many things out in the world

just waiting to be discovered

one of my favorite things to do is to stumble upon them

share them with my camera and my words

 

“anything that excites me for any reason, i will photograph;

not searching for unusual subject matter, but making the commonplace unusual.”

-edward weston

twitterpated.

Standard

word of the day:  twitterpated

part of speech: adjective

origin: American English, 1940s

  1. infatuated or obsessed
  2. in a state of nervous excitement

 

Examples of twitterpated in a sentence:

“‘Nearly everybody gets twitterpated in the springtime.’ — Bambi (1942)”

“The family is all twitterpated as they pace around the waiting room for the announcement of the new baby.”

 

When was the last time you were twitterpated?

 

 

“words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart.”

-william shakespeare

grandiloquent.

Standard

we all know that person

who uses pretentious words as a means to impress

which generally results in the opposite effect

like when someone uses the word ‘grandiloquent’ in a sentence.

GRANDILOQUENT

part of speech: adjective

origin: latin, late 16th century

definition:

speaking or expressed in a lofty style, often to the point of being pompous or bombastic.

related words:

sentence examples:

Even though Rick did not understand the grandiloquent words, he still used them to impress his wealthy friends. 

When I heard the salesman’s grandiloquent speech, I knew he was trying to make the car deal sound better than it actually was.

 

“i am trying to impress myself. i have yet to do it.”

-shia labeouf

treasure house.

Standard

in 1852 Roget published his thesaurus, a word that means ‘treasure house’ in greek. 

 JANUARY 18: NATIONAL THESAURUS DAY

British lexicographer Peter Mark Roget—who is most famous for publishing The Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (a.k.a. Roget’s Thesaurus) in 1852—was born on January 18, 1779. As such, this is a day to honor, celebrate, extol, laud, praise, revere, salute, etc. his contributions.

“the man is not wholly evil, he has a thesaurus in his cabin.”

– j.m. barrie, author of Peter Pan, describing the character Captain Hook. 

Personal note:

I am a huge fan of alphabets, words, and more words, in all languages

the thesaurus is one of my favorite books

and it is indeed a treasure house.

image credit: the right word, Roget and his thesaurus by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet