Tag Archives: words

scribbles, scraps, and scrawls.

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 anyone who works with me, is related to me, or friends with me

knows i love writing my ideas/notes/lists

on any random found piece of paper 

 all makes perfect sense to me 

interesting to look back at later

when out of context and a bit of time has gone by.

 

“but those who cannot write, and those who can, all rhyme, and scrawl, and scribble to a man.”

-alexander pope

 

 

note: (photo above is an “S” page ( S is for: scribbles, scraps and scrawls)

from a work-in progress – my memoir,

done in a large-format, alphabet book style,

using a bajillion collage pieces cut from everywhere – the best way i know to tell my story.)

story about the stories.

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on this special day

i brought out

an old treasured story 

written by

my former student, nicole

who i taught for grades k-2

(in a school where we were known by our first names)

 a story about me sharing stories

 made me cry happy tears to read

how much she enjoyed the stories

what ginormous heaps of praise

from a fellow roald dahl fan. 

happy roald dahl story day!!

“words are our most inexhaustible source of magic.”

-albus dumbledore (j.k. rowling, harry potter series)

crabwise.

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not olive, but she walks like this sometimes.

is it a crab? is it a cat? what is it doing?

CRABWISE!

KRAB-wiyz

Part of speech: adverb

Origin: English, 20th century

Definition: To, toward, or from the side, typically in an awkward way.

Examples in a sentence:

“Roberto moved crabwise without taking his eyes off the dodgeball.”

“My cat only moves crabwise if she knows I’m going to try to give her a pill.”

“some things cannot be changed. you cannot teach a crab to walk straight.”

-aristophanes

 

aha!

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yesterday was my favorite day of the week for crosswords

sunday paper delivered at home

weekend puzzle inside

waiting to challenge me

my personal process may include

a tiny bit (iota) of cursing (*&@^) at times

until that ‘aha’ (eureka moment) arrives.

word of the day:

cruciverbalist

cru-sih-Ver-be-list

part of speech: noun

origin: american english, mid 1970s

definition: a person who enjoys or is skilled at crosswords.

example in a sentence:

“my mother, the cruciverbalist, still receives the daily newspaper so she can solve the crossword with her pen.”

“just got excited at a crossword clue that was ‘cheese lovers’ and was like ooh,

there’s a name for people like me it turns out it was: mice.

-word porn

one of my fav films

these are my people.

 

noetic or poetic?

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NOETIC

no-ED-ik

Part of speech: adjective 

Origin: Greek, mid-17th century

Definition: Relating to mental activity or the intellect.

Examples in a sentence:

“The philosophy department attracts noetic students.”

“Noah was equally athletic and noetic”

Some travel life, 

Shining brightly noetic

But as for me, 

 I’d rather wax poetic. 

-beth

 

 

 

image credit: npr brightside

huh?

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The word “huh” packs a lot of meaning into just one syllable. When we use it, we might be expressing confusion, asking for clarification, or requesting that a statement be repeated. We’re also communicating so concisely there’s hardly a break in the conversation, making “huh” the politest kind of interruption.

No wonder, then, that the word “huh” appears in multiple languages. In fact, according to a recent study in the journal PLOS ONE, linguists have found that the word is used to express confusion not only in related language families, but across multiple, independently developed languages. The researchers, who recently won an Ig Nobel Prize honoring their study, argued that “huh?” is so common it may actually be universal.

According to New York Magazine,  the researchers studied conversational use of the word “huh” in 10 different languages, including English, Icelandic, Murrinh-Patha (from Australia), and Cha’palaa (from Ecuador). Though these languages don’t share an origin, they still employ “huh” in much the same way.

The researchers believe that the widespread use of the word “huh” is an example of convergent evolution. In each language, “huh” developed independently, but was shaped by similar environmental or linguistic pressures—for example, the need for a relatively polite way to signal confusion. According to the study, the word “fulfills a crucial need shared by all languages –the efficient signaling of problems of hearing and understanding.”

“Huh” is not an innate human sound, like a grunt or emotional cry, the researchers say. Rather, it’s learned, taught to children, and passed down linguistically from generation to generation. According to researchers, its universality is a result of its important conversational function. Most of us probably take the word “huh” for granted—or don’t even think of it as a word at all—but according to researchers, that’s exactly why it’s so important: It doesn’t draw attention to itself.

 

“before I came here I was confused about this subject.

having listened to your lecture I am still confused. but on a higher level.”

-enrico fermi

 

 

 

Source Credit: New York Magazine, Photo credit: Animal Channel

 

 

 

animal planet

alphabet soup.

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i have always loved alphabets

when i was young

one of my favorite days ever

was when i could finally

decode the letters and read words

i love alphabets created out of every imaginable material, and alpha art and images of all kinds

today i tried to look up the word for someone who loves alphabets

and there was nothing to be found

the closest i could come was for someone who loves words:

What do you call a person who loves words?
A logophile is a person who loves words; a word nerd.
Because it’s not all that commonly known,
logophile is probably most commonly used by logophiles themselves.
(of which i am one)
but alas, ironically, no word for someone who loves the letters that make up every word.

“human society, the world, and the whole of mankind is to be found in the alphabet.”

-victor hugo

 

 

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