Category Archives: moon

inconceivable mystery.

Standard

blood moon courtesy of nasa

The total lunar eclipse with a few more novelties will start tonight, May 15 at 10:27 p.m., according to Mike Narlock, head of Astronomy at Cranbrook Institute of Science. Narlock says the progression to the total lunar eclipse will take a while. The totality portion of the lunar eclipse starts at 11:29 p.m. Sunday and lasts until 12:53 a.m. Monday, May 16.

You’ll have to stay up late on a Sunday night to see the eclipse, but it may be worth it.

There are a few things going on with this full moon. First, this month’s full moon is called the Flower Moon. It’s easy to understand why this moon has that name, with our spring bulbs blooming now.

The full moon is also a super moon. This occurs when the position of the moon is at its closest point to Earth. The orbit of the moon around Earth isn’t a perfect circle, it’s orbit more egg-shaped than circular. On May 15, the moon will be in the spot of its orbit where it is closest to Earth.

So the total eclipse is a Flower Moon and a super moon. But wait – there’s more. It is also a blood moon.  The phrase “blood moon” really isn’t a true astronomical term. All lunar eclipses turn some amount of red. During a total lunar eclipse, Earth passes directly between the sun and the moon. The Earth’s shadow is cast upon the moon. During a total lunar eclipse, blue light is filtered out of the light hitting the moon. Red light can still make it through and be cast upon the moon. So the moon should look at least somewhat red. If there is a lot of dust or water vapor in our sky at the time of the eclipse, the moon would be a darker red.

“there is something haunting in the light of the moon;

it has all the dispassionateness of a disembodied soul,

and something of its inconceivable mystery.”

-joseph conrad

 

 

credits: mike narlock, cranbrook institute of science, mark torregrossa, mlive, nasa

11.

Standard

(in honor of all the recent space activity and a soon to arrive full moon – a repost from 2 years ago)

50th anniversary of the week of the Apollo 11 moon landing

I was 11

on the cusp of everything 

we went over

to my parents’ friends’ house

everyone was transfixed

air was electric

all gathered around the tv

watching

silent and awestruck

gobsmacked

as the first man walked on the moon

spoke his first words on the moon

 lots of emotion in the house

I ran to the window to look at the moon 

hoping I would see him up there

right in the middle of all of this

the hostess

left to go to the hospital

to have her baby

she named him neil

after that man on the moon.

“we ran as if to meet the moon.” 

― robert frost

image credit: Ann Arbor district library archives

The moon looks upon many night flowers; the night flowers see but one moon. Jean Ingelow

Standard

under

Under the Spell of the Moon: Art for Children from the World’s Great Illustrators
by Patricia Aldana (Editor), Various contributors (Illustrator), Stan Dragland (Translator), Katherine Patterson (Introduction) 

The illustrated picture book is one of the most important genres of children’s literature. Great artists have devoted some or all of their working lives to creating art that accompanies a text written for children. While book illustration has been practiced for thousands of years, picture book illustration is a relatively new phenomena. This beautiful book is a collection of poetry from all around the world, illustrated by some of the finest picture book artists working today including Peter Sis, Anthony Browne and Quentin Blake.

IBBY (the International Board on Books for Children), at the heart of whose mandate lies the promotion of books of the highest quality, has been honoring illustrators through the Hans Christian Andersen Awards for nearly forty years. IBBY has also been helping to support the spread of book illustration for children to countries and cultures where such artistic activity is relatively new. In honor of IBBY’s work and to support its future work, many of the world’s greatest illustrators for children have donated art based on a text of their choice drawn from their childhood and culture. The result is a book that celebrates art created for children from around the world. The texts in the book are in both the original language and in English. Noted author and editor Stan Dragland has translated the texts.Groundwood Books will pay a royalty of 15% of all sales to IBBY.

I’ve never seen a moon in the sky that, if it didn’t take my breath away, at least misplaced it for a moment.
Colin Farrell