Tag Archives: history

begin again.

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*life finds a way 

 

“no matter how hard the past is, you can always begin again.”

-buddha

 

  * the above photo was taken while exploring what was once the traverse city state hospital (1885-1989), and more recently has been restored and given new life as the traverse city village commons. most buildings are now teeming with life and commerce, while other buildings still await their second chance, ghost stories and all.

 

energy and daring.

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We remember the life and lasting legacy of Robert F. Kennedy
and his commitment to a more just and peaceful world with his words:
“Each time a man stands up for an ideal… he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope,
and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring,
those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance.”
November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968
John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
 SWPC-RFK-025-001

margins.

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throughout your life, you probably never thought much about the purpose of margin lines on your writing paper. they’re obviously there to help keep your writing neat, right? margin lines were originally added to paper not to keep your writing neat, but to protect it from rats. rats love to eat around the edges of paper, apparently. so as long as you keep your writing within the margins, all your hard work will be safe from these little fiends!

i loved to doodle in the margins of my paper when bored in class.

anyone else make use of them?

 

 

“i love the broad margin to my life. ” 

-henry thoreau

 

 

source credit: historymates.com

industry.

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This week marks the anniversary of the debut of Diego Rivera’s “Detroit Industry Murals” in 1933.
Rivera’s work is a monumental 27-panel mural at the Detroit Institute of Arts
that portrays the geological, technological, and human history of Detroit. 
I have visited these murals since I was a young child and I never fail to be amazed.

Explore what makes “Detroit Industry Murals” a masterpiece in this episode of Bank of America‘s “Masterpiece Moment.”

credits: detroit institute of arts, bank of america

oh, liectenstein reader, who art thou?

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 i have exactly one blog follower

in the micro country of liectenstein

with so many interesting things about this amazing tiny place

here are just a couple of examples:

 

in 1886 liectenstein had an army of 80 men who fought during the austro-prussian war

they suffered no injuries or deaths

and returned with 81 men because they made a new italian friend from the opposition army.

the army was disbanded soon after and they haven’t had an army since. 

 

and then there was the accidental invasion which didn’t cause much of a stir:

i really love their approach to life

and i’m guessing my one reader is a pretty laid-back person

and with such a tiny country

perhaps a descendent of that new italian friend they brought back from the war?

here’s to liectenstien!

 

“be so good they can’t ignore you.”

-steve martin

 

image credit: expat.com

voice of america.

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on president’s day

remembering those placemats that taught us about our country 

“justice is conscience, not a personal conscience but the conscience of the whole of humanity,

those who clearly recognize the voice of their own conscience usually recognize also the voice of justice.”

-aleksandr solzhenitsyn

magic all around you.

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One hundred years ago this month, the magician P.T. Selbit ushered his assistant into an upright wooden box, sealed it, laid it flat, and got down to business, sawing the box right down the middle. The show, according to magic experts, was the first time a performer ever sawed someone in half. Why has this trick survived, when so many others haven’t? If you ask magicians, NYT writer Alex Marshall spoke with six — they eventually land on one answer. “It’s just the simplicity of it,” said Mike Caveney, a magician who’s writing a history of this trick. “Magicians say a good trick is one that can be described in a few words, and ‘sawing a lady in half’ is very few words,” he added. As for being the assistant, “When you’re doing it you’re not a passive person,” one magician said. “It’s claustrophobic, and quite noisy, but such fun!”

” i believe your reality is what you make it, what you choose to see, and what you choose to allow yourself to do.

there are possibilities all around you – magic all around you – no matter what situation you’re in.”

-keke palmer

Story credit: Alex Marshall, NYT- Image credit: Nolan Pellitier

 

more fun.

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mental floss has reached into their incredible research bag of treasures

to share some board games that may have had their time 

but alas, have not remained classics.

below are a few gems and i’m not saying i wouldn’t want to play them,

i am a huge fan of board games of all kinds –

 

Aside from Parker Brothers, few board game manufacturers have come close to Milton Bradley’s track record: Millions of players across multiple generations have put in serious time playing TwisterYahtzeeThe Game of Life, and Battleship.

But while games like Simon and Connect Four have kept up brand appearances over the decades, it’s possible that founder Milton Bradley might have flinched at some of the other titles that bear his name.

 BIG FOOT (1977)

The mythical woodland creature experienced a considerable amount of attention in the 1970s, including an encounter with Steve Austin on The Six Million-Dollar Man. (Andre the Giant was cast in the fur suit.) A famous and non-copyrightable beast made a perfect premise for a game in which players assumed the roles of Alaskan gold prospectors who roll dice while trying to avoid the “footprints” made by the monster. Although Bigfoot looks affable enough on the game box, his plastic game piece  appears to be anything but.

TOWN DUMP (1977)

It’s never too early to get a child used to playing with garbage. In this game, two players take turns winding up a miniature bulldozer that propels itself through pieces of trash and pushes them out of the way. The object appears to be to clear waste out of your dump and into your rival’s property, which imparts a valuable lesson: Let your discarded trash become someone else’s problem.

LOBBY: A CAPITAL GAME (1949)

“Here’s your chance to be a congressman! You can pass all your favorite bills and lobby against those you oppose.” Milton Bradley felt confident a game of governmental regulations and lobbying would be a hit with anyone “old enough to read a newspaper.”

 

 

“Life is more fun if you play games.”
― Roald Dahl, 

 

 

Credits: Jake Rossen-Mental Floss, Milton Bradley Company, Ebay photos

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