Tag Archives: community

torpedo.

Standard

what do you get

when you combine every kid in the city who is now out of school

with a very hot day and a community pool?

lots of squeals, water fights, slides, splashes, and snacks

everyone so happy to be free

all summer ahead of them

 has the festive feel of adults

celebrating with a long night of cocktails

but the kids are hopped up on nothing but pure sunshine and water.

 

‘i feel like a torpedo.’

-michael phelps (u.s.a. olympic gold medalist in swimming)

 

 

 

image credit: New York July 12, 1937 McCarren Park Pool- vintage photo

 

 

Advertisements

museum.

Standard

curbside museum

a small and quirky museum hidden is inside a fence

in canmore, alberta, canada

curbside museum is an unassuming curiosity in the mountain town of canmore, canada. the tiny museum is always packed with intricate little exhibits that rotate every so often. each exhibit is incredibly detailed, their contents all stuffing the glass showcase to the brim with a delightfully unexpected assortment of items.

this tiny museum is hidden within a hole in a fence that lines a busy street. the gilded frame is the only hint that this particular stretch of fence holds more than first meets the eye. you could easily walk right past it if you weren’t paying attention.

you’ll find subjects ranging from common scenes to those that transcend into the realm of fantasy. some of the showcases take on a more serious, factual tone, though many exhibits do indeed have an element of whimsy and charm.

the museum is a fun addition to the town and adds a moment of joy for any pedestrians who stop and take a peek. it’s a reward for eagled-eyed passersby who take the time to notice their surroundings. the museum is free and is open day and night.

“a museum should not just be a place for fancy paintings

but should be a place where we can

communicate our lives through our everyday objects.”

-orhan pamuk

 

 

 

 

credits:  curbside museum, atlas obscura.com, city of canmore, alberta

treasure trove.

Standard

Turkish Garbage Collectors Open Library Full of Discarded Books

Turkish garbage collectors in the country’s capital city of Ankara have opened a public library that is full of books that were originally destined to be put into landfill. The workers began collecting discarded books and opened the new library in the Çankaya district of Ankara. News of the library has spread and now people have begun donating books directly to the library, rather than throwing them away.

As CNN reports, the library was originally created for the use of the employees friends and family but, as it grew in size, the library was officially opened to the public in September of last year. “We started to discuss the idea of creating a library from these books. And when everyone supported it, this project happened,” said Çankaya Mayor Alper Tasdelen, whose local government spearheaded the opening of the library.

The library now has over 6,000 fiction and non-fiction books and includes a children’s section, an area dedicated to scientific research books, and a number of English and French language books for those who are bilingual. The library building itself used to be a brick factory and is located at the sanitation department HQ. The building featured long corridors and an aged brick facade and transformed perfectly into a library.

Books can be withdrawn for two weeks at a time, with an extension available if required. The library’s collection has now become so vast that it loans many of the books to schools, educational programs, and even prisons.“Village schoolteachers from all over Turkey are requesting books,” Tasdelen said. The library has also created new job opportunities as it requires full time staff to run and support it.

The library has proven to be a huge hit with the community. Children of the employees often enjoy reading there and local school children visit to study. Local cyclists who pedal through the nearby valley often take a break there and enjoy the lounge area and chess boards. “Before, I wished that I had a library in my house. Now we have a library here,” Serhat Baytemur, a 32-year-old garbage collector, told state media.

“ours is a culture and a time immensely rich in trash as it is in treasures.”
― ray bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

 

credits: kerrytown bookfest, forreadingaddicts.co.uk,cnn

 

amnesty.

Standard

New Year, New You!

Everyone starts fresh in 2018 with all late fees waived.

POOF!

what a generous surprise gift from our library! 

another reason why our community loves and supports them. 

 

 

“amnesty is as good for those who give it as for those who receive it.

it has the admirable quality of bestowing mercy on both sides. “

-victor hugo