Category Archives: kindness

how to be.

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 This sculpture was built by the Irish people in their own country to honor the American Choctaw Indian tribe.

They were grateful because the Choctaw people sent money to Ireland

when they learned that Irish people were starving due to the potato famine.

And that is a lesson in how to be a person in this world.

 

“Generosity is not giving me that which I need more than you do,

but it is giving me that which you need more than I do.”

-Khalil Gibran

 

 

==

source: open homes, open hearts u.s., karen waters

book fairies.

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how sweet to find this book 

 sitting outside on the window ledge of a downtown store  

on a sunny saturday

just waiting for someone

to pick it up and take it home to read. 

gratitude to the book fairies.

“books are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind. books are humanity in print.”

-barbara w. tuchman

crumb.

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i will never forget

it was a friday

 show and tell time

sitting on the floor

they took turns going around our circle

each child sharing their special thing

other children kindly looking at it

showing appreciation for what the others shared

then we came to n

who clearly had forgotten to bring something

yet said “i have something too”

he proudly walked around the circle

both hands together

gently cradling a single crumb

that he had picked up off our floor

showing each child

talking about his crumb

as the others

were all so kind

smiling at his crumb

complimenting him on his crumb

accepting the crumb as his special thing

without judging his crumb

my favorite show and tell special thing of all time.

“the wise learn from the experience of others, and the creative know how to make a crumb of experience go a long way.”

-eric hoffer

frozen journey, warm heart.

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RCMP Cpl. Robert Drapeau stands next to Ranger Gary Bath,

Lynn Marchessault, Payton Marchessault, Rebecca Marchessault

and Tim Marchessault near the U.S.-Canadian border crossing. (CNN)

CNN reports a story that’s sure to warm your heart:

There’s nice, and then there’s Canadian-nice, which sometimes involves driving a total stranger, her two kids, a pair of elderly dogs and a cat named “Midnight” more than a thousand miles through a snowstorm to another country.

It all started because Lynn Marchessault and her family needed to get from Georgia to Alaska, where her husband is stationed at the U.S. Army base – Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks.

So Marchessault packed up all their belongings, bought a truck that could handle Alaska winters, rented a U-Haul, and made plans for a cross-country family adventure during the balmy days of early fall. But, 2020 happened.

Marchessault waited months for the travel documents that would allow her to drive from Georgia, through Canada and up to Alaska. Due to the coronavirus, Canada had instituted strict guidelines for Americans traveling through the country, en route to Alaska. By the time she got things in order, her September road trip was pushed to November. Besides the restrictions placed on her by the Canadian government, she knew she’d have to keep up a good driving pace to avoid the worst of winter weather.

The first 3,000 miles of the trip went well. They entered Canada through Saskatchewan. Border authorities checked Marchessault’s paperwork and warned her to keep to the main roads and stop only when necessary for food or gas.The family would have to order any food to-go, even at motels they stayed in along the way. She was allotted five days to drive through Canada and get to the U.S. border in Alaska.

The farther north they traveled, the worse the weather got. Marchessault, who was raised in the South, encountered her first winter white-out conditions. Then she ran out of windshield wiping fluid, slush covered her windows, she couldn’t see to drive, and her tires seemed to be losing traction.

Gary Bath, a Canadian ranger from British Columbia, whose job includes training members of the Canadian military to survive the Arctic, was at home when he saw his friend’s Facebook post about the stranded American family. “A lot of people were wanting to donate money or saying they wish they could help but no one was able to get off work or be close enough to go do it,” Bath told CTV News Channel on Friday. “So, I talked to my wife and we decided that I would drive all the way from Pink Mountain to the border.” Bath says he stepped in to offer the family a helping hand because “it was the right thing to do.”

“It took us two and half days, but for me it wasn’t a big deal,” he said. “I love driving so what a great way to see parts of the country that I haven’t seen in a few minutes.” Marchessault says that she and her family are very grateful for Bath’s help and says that they intended to be lifelong friends. “We’re hoping that when we do leave Alaska some of the COVID restrictions will be lifted by then because we would stop to see Gary and his wife on the way through and just thank them again for what they did to help us,” Marchessault added.

credits: CNN, Martha Shade – CDV News, Den Lourenco

“unexpected kindness is the most powerful, least costly, and most underrated agent of human change.”

-bob kerry

reaching out.

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one friend shares her flower with another

 

as a teacher of young children

i am always struck

by the natural way

that children connect with each other

reaching out

with genuine kindness and kinship.

 

“anyone who takes time to be kind is beautiful.”

-author unknown

get on the bus.

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what an adventure it would be to travel on the ‘make america kind again’ bus

 

“human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the figure of a free people.

a nation does not have to be cruel to be tough.”

-Franklin D. Roosevelt, 32nd President of the United States