Tag Archives: food

food of the soul.

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at my daughter’s house

getting ready to take the boys to a movie

 i opened the freezer and looked for

something healthy and quick to eat before leaving

i chose what appeared to be

some quinoa/whole oats/ancient grains kind of thing

took off the top and heated it up

when i took my first bite i soon realized

there had been a mistake

on my part

it had a taste and texture that really didn’t register

as anything i had ever eaten before

 vaguely familiar, but not so much

far from an ancient grain

and it did not taste good

though perhaps was healthy

 i looked back again at the top

this time really looking

and saw that it was lightly labeled ‘bee wax’

no doubt from their hives in the backyard

ah, that.

“and what, socrates, is the food of the soul?

surely, I said, knowledge is the food of the soul.”

-plato

magical fathering.

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children’s book author roald dahl and his daughter, lucy

What If Willy Wonka Was Your Dad?

Roald Dahl’s Magical Parenting With Food

“food was a huge part of our upbringing,” lucy dahl says. her father delighted his children with fanciful “midnight feasts” in the woods and often used mealtime to test out new characters from stories he was working on.

three-course dinner chewing gum.
fizzy lifting drinks.
everlasting gobstoppers.

these, of course, are the creations of willy wonka, who himself is the creation of author roald dahl.  food is a huge part of his work, and as it turns out, dahl’s creative and sometimes twisted approach to food wasn’t confined to his books.

“food was a huge part of our upbringing,” says dahl’s daughter lucy.
tn this week’s episode of the sporkful podcast, ahead of father’s day, lucy shares stories of the witch’s potions that accompanied bedtime, the cabbage her father said came straight from the queen’s garden, and being woken up in the middle of the night to eat chocolate.

“everything about our childhood was eccentric,” she says, “although we didn’t realize it at the time because it was just normal to us.” lucy dahl is 51 now, but she still bursts with childlike glee when she recalls her father’s “midnight feasts.”

he’d wake the kids up in the middle of the night and pile them into the car – which was full of hot chocolate and cookies – and drive them up the road in the english countryside where they lived.
then they’d walk in to the woods in their pajamas to look for badgers.

“you couldn’t talk, and he’d say, ‘nobody move! and if you’ve got an itch, blow on it. try and hold your breath, try not to breathe!’ ” lucy recalls. “and sure enough, mr. badger would come prowling out and walk right past us. it was incredibly exciting.”only once they had seen an animal could they tuck in to their sweet feast.”and then,” lucy says, “we’d all go home, back to bed, delighted.”

roald dahl kept his kids entertained during normal eating hours, too. he often used mealtime to test out new characters from stories he was working on.”the minpins lived in the woods beyond our house,” lucy remembers, referring to one of her father’s last books, about a tiny people who live inside trees. “the BFG – the big friendly giant – lived underneath our orchard. it all coincided with what we ate. for breakfast were minpins’ eggs and fried bread. but what they actually were were quail eggs.”

just as roald dahl used stories to bring food to life at home, he used food to bring characters to life in his books. willy wonka’s fizzy lifting drinks aren’t just a fun idea – they also tell us something about who he is. in fantastic mr. fox, the three mean farmers who are out to get mr. fox are described only by their body shapes and their diets.

so this father’s day, wake your kids up in the middle of the night, take them into the woods in their pajamas to look for badgers, load them full of chocolate, then put them back to bed.

“even though you’re growing up,

you should never stop having fun. “

– nina dobrev

 

credits: npr, the spoon, the sporkful, dan pashman, m.haircloth

wha?

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after working hard all day
without taking a break to eat
 tired and hungry and looking for the easy way out
i decided to just drive through the closest place
to get food to eat on my way home
 trying to eat something healthy
 was a quite a challenge based on the menu
ordered a small wrap without sauce and unsweetened iced tea
they repeated my order to me
i confirmed it and paid
got my order
slipped back into traffic and headed off
only to quickly discover
much to my dismay
they had actually
added extra sauce, a sugary fake honey mustard sort of thing to my wrap
and poured me a fully-sugared iced tea
was this a trick?
had i asked for my order in some other language that i was unaware of ?
did yes actually mean no?
was i a horrible communicator?
did i appear to need a sugar boost?
too tired and too much traffic to go back
but one of us in the equation was clearly confused
and perhaps both.
“the single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”

-george bernard shaw

image credit: pinterest

 

“farming is a profession of hope” – brian brett

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today we met the farmers

they got down low

and

 told us everything

they showed us how to plant our own food

so that we could eat it later

they answered all of our questions

and told us

how the food would taste better

because we know the farmers now.

“know you food, know your farmers, and know your kitchen.”

-joel salatin

donuts at night.

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this is an amazing turn of events. 

ann arbor’s washtenaw dairy has begun delivering doughnuts friday and saturday nights! they deliver from 9 pm to 2 am within a 3 mile radius of the dairy. depending on demand, the delivery time is 30-45 minutes. the minimum order is one dozen and at least 12 hours notice is needed for orders of more than 10 dozen. doughnuts are $9 a dozen, with a $2 delivery charge. call the dairy to order between 9 pm and 2 am.

“between the optimist and the pessimist, the difference is droll.

the optimist sees the doughnut; the pessimist the hole!”

– oscar wilde

“americans love popcorn, and their love doesn’t quit.” – rosecrans baldwin

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victor-nunes-art2

“every once in a while, someone will mail me a single popcorn kernel that didn’t pop.

i’ll get out a fresh kernel, tape it to a piece of paper and mail it back to them. “

-orville redenbacher

national-popcorn-day-450x214

“so random but a couple months ago a boy scout came to our door selling popcorn.

he told V, “i know it’s not as good as the cookies but it’s what we do.” 😂😂 

-facebook quote from my daughter’s friend, m

image credit: victor nunes art

one man’s castle……

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                                                   mars cheese castle in kenosha, wisconsin

Some people eat cheese. Others make it. Still others sell it. And some, like the Ventura family, honor it with a magnificent roadside castle.  Since 1957 the Mars Cheese Castle has proudly dispensed a wide selection of cheese and related products to travelers looking to take home a memento of their journey through Wisconsin. Originally opened as a gas station in 1947, Mars Cheese Castle eventually grew to become the largest, oldest, showiest purveyor at the junction of 1-94 and Wisconsin Highway 142, a spot once dubbed “Wisconsin’s most visible cheese interchange” by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. The store was named not after the planet but after the original owner, Mario Ventura Sr., though this detail hasn’t stopped the venue from incorporating a small touch of outer space into its castle motif.

In 2011, plans to widen I-94 forced Mars Cheese Castle to abandon the storefront it had used for over 50 years. Rather than mourn the loss of their beloved fortress, the proprietors used the opportunity to update the store’s image. Whereas the turrets on the former building’s facade merely suggested a castle, the new, larger store, outfitted with a drawbridge and a watchtower, is an abode truly fit for a king (of cheese). In exchange for its willingness to relocate, the state agreed to allow Mars Cheese Castle to keep its iconic sign, which, at 80 feet tall, violates current height restrictions for signs along the interstate.

Though cheese is, of course, the main attraction, Mars Cheese Castle also sells a variety of food items, and cheese-themed knick-knacks, including the state’s most essential souvenir, the famed Wisconsin cheese-head hat.

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Mars Cheese Castle’s iconic sign stands 80 feet tall

“how can anyone govern a nation that has

two hundred and forty-six different kinds of cheese?”

-charles de gaulle

credits: atlas obscura