Category Archives: parks

bear with me.

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National Park Service Notice –

READ: Please don’t run from bears or push your slower friends down in attempts of saving yourself.

As a follow-up to a previous post, if you come upon a stationary bear, move away slowly and sideways; this allows you to keep an eye on the bear and avoid tripping. Moving sideways is also non-threatening to bears. Do NOT run, but if the bear follows, stop and hold your ground. Like dogs, they will chase fleeing animals. Do NOT climb a tree. Both grizzlies and black bears can climb trees. Do NOT push down a slower friend (even if you think the friendship has run its course).

Stay calm and remember that most bears do not want to attack you; they usually just want to be left alone. Don’t we all? Identify yourself by making noise so the bear knows you are a human and not a prey animal. Help the bear recognize you as a human. We recommend using your voice. (Waving and showing off your opposable thumb means nothing to the bear) The bear may come closer or stand on its hind legs to get a better look or smell. A standing bear is usually curious, not threatening.

P.S. We apologize to any “friends” who were brought on a hike as the “bait” or were sacrificed to save the group. You will be missed.

#FindYourPark #RecreateResponsibly

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/bears/index.htm

“i’d rather write about polar bears than people”

-mary oliver

image credit: Bear resting on a log thinking bear things at Katmai National Park & Preserve, NPS/ J. Ehrlenbach

goats.

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goats from twin willow ranch  have arrived at gallup park! ten goats in all will be busy over the course of three weeks “goatscaping,” removing brush from the park’s two islands. the islands are normally accessible via foot bridge; but during the three-week goat initiative, june 6–June 27, the islands, and bridges, will be closed.

goatscaping is an old-fashioned, eco-friendly and entertaining form of brush control. goats like to eat invasive plants like honeysuckle and buckthorn; poison ivy (to which goats are not allergic as some humans are); and pretty much any green plant within reach. this pilot project is part of an ongoing effort to clear out the overgrowth and invasive shrubbery as park staff work toward a long-term maintenance plan.

the goat initiative has an interactive component as well, for those curious about this work. GIVE 365 will be hosting three goat talk and walk tours in conjunction with volunteer work days. how to participate in a tour, for more information about this initiative, including goat photos and their bios, and more is available at http://www.a2gov.org/goats-at-gallup.

“ideas are easy.

it’s the execution of ideas that really separates the sheep from the goats.”

-sue grafton

 

source: ann arbor parks and recreation, mlive, ann arbor townies