Monthly Archives: January 2020

beneath.

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Beneath The Sweater And The Skin

How many years of beauty do I have left?

she asks me.

How many more do you want?

Here. Here is 34. Here is 50.

When you are 80 years old

and your beauty rises in ways

your cells cannot even imagine now

and your wild bones grow luminous and ripe,

having carried the weight

of a passionate life.

When your hair is aflame

with winter

and you have decades of

learning and leaving and loving

sewn into 

the corners of your eyes

and your children come home

to find their own history

in your face.

When you know what it feels like to fail

ferociously

and have gained the 

capacity

to rise and rise and rise again.

When you can make your tea

on a quiet and ridiculously lonely afternoon

and still have a song in your heart

Queen owl wings beating

beneath the cotton of your sweater.

Because your beauty began there

beneath the sweater and the skin,

remember?

This is when I will take you 

into my arms and coo

YOU BRAVE AND GLORIOUS THING

you’ve come so far..

I see you.

Your beauty is breathtaking.

 

 

 

 

Credits: Author: Jeannette Encinias, Studio Yuki Photography, Thank you Russ Thomas

stardust.

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Scanning electron microscope image of one of the clumps of presolar grains, or stardust. Image via Janaína N. Ávila/EurekAlert!

 

Ancient stardust in meteorite is older than Earth

Grains of stardust – particles left behind by star explosions – in an Australian meteorite are now the oldest known material on Earth. A new study suggests this stardust came to be long before our sun ever existed.

As the saying goes, we are all made of stardust. It’s true. The elements in our bodies – oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, calcium and so on – are made in the thermonuclear furnaces of stars. When scientists speak of stardust, or cosmic dust, they’re speaking of the leftover tiny particles from dead stars that exploded as supernovae. This stardust later goes into forming new stars, planets and moons, including those in our own solar system. It goes into the solar system’s debris, the asteroids and comets, and ultimately meteorites, or rocks from space that find their way to Earth’s surface. Now scientists at the Field Museum in Chicago have found the oldest known samples of stardust in a meteorite that landed in Australia. The meteorite is estimated to be 5 to 7 billion years old. The stardust samples are the oldest material ever discovered on Earth. This dust is even older than our solar system.

The new peer-reviewed study was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on January 13, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

credits: SPACE – Paul Scott Anderson, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Earth Sky, Chicago Field Museum, Phillip Heck

grandiloquent.

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we all know that person

who uses pretentious words as a means to impress

which generally results in the opposite effect

like when someone uses the word ‘grandiloquent’ in a sentence.

GRANDILOQUENT

part of speech: adjective

origin: latin, late 16th century

definition:

speaking or expressed in a lofty style, often to the point of being pompous or bombastic.

related words:

sentence examples:

Even though Rick did not understand the grandiloquent words, he still used them to impress his wealthy friends. 

When I heard the salesman’s grandiloquent speech, I knew he was trying to make the car deal sound better than it actually was.

 

“i am trying to impress myself. i have yet to do it.”

-shia labeouf

treasure house.

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in 1852 Roget published his thesaurus, a word that means ‘treasure house’ in greek. 

 JANUARY 18: NATIONAL THESAURUS DAY

British lexicographer Peter Mark Roget—who is most famous for publishing The Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (a.k.a. Roget’s Thesaurus) in 1852—was born on January 18, 1779. As such, this is a day to honor, celebrate, extol, laud, praise, revere, salute, etc. his contributions.

“the man is not wholly evil, he has a thesaurus in his cabin.”

– j.m. barrie, author of Peter Pan, describing the character Captain Hook. 

Personal note:

I am a huge fan of alphabets, words, and more words, in all languages

the thesaurus is one of my favorite books

and it is indeed a treasure house.

image credit: the right word, Roget and his thesaurus by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet