Category Archives: color

out of the box.

Standard

National Crayon Day on March 31  sparks fond memories of childhood creations in full color as we celebrate one of America’s most beloved toys, the crayon! Crayons delight our senses not just with their brilliant colors but also with their distinct smell, the feel of them in our hands, and for some kids, the waxy taste. With over 12 million crayons made daily, one is never far from reach. So, grab your box of 64 crayons, sharpener included, and get ready for some artistic expression and nostalgia.

Crayons have a colorful history. While hued wax molds have existed for centuries, the modern-day crayon got its start in the 1900s. Crayola crayons were introduced in 1903 by Binney & Smith as a safer and cheaper alternative to the art utensils in use at that time.  Binney & Smith premiered their famous eight-pack of crayons with the color line-up: Black, Brown, Orange, Violet, Blue, Green, Red, and Yellow. This color mix, along with their names, remained unchanged for 45 years. Since then, many colors have been added, color names and packaging have changed, and color styles such as neon, metallics, and glitter have emerged. A few colors have even been retired from the color wheel, typically on March 31.

The Crayola crayon has a special place in the hearts of Americans and Americana. It was one of the original inductees into the National Toy Hall of Fame in November 1999. It is estimated the average American will have used 730 crayons by their 10th birthday. Even Mr. Rogers has had his hand in the history of crayons by molding the official 100 billionth crayon in February 1996 at the Crayola plant in Easton. Crayons not only add color to our lives, but they’ve also been held as an analogy for the colorfulness of the human race and our ability to live together in a diverse world. Crayons have been used for creating artwork for years.

Originally used for industrial purposes, their popularity soared when the brand Crayola was introduced.  Crayons are used as a medium for creating artwork by children in schools mostly, but is also popular among adults who use it for creating contemporary art. Many households have a box of crayons stashed away somewhere, and today is the day it is pulled out. Everyone can enjoy crayons for creating vivid drawings. 

BY THE NUMBERS

100 – the number of colors Crayola crayons are available in. 

50 – the number of crayon colors retired by Crayola. 

3 billion – the number of crayons produced by Crayola in a year. 

18th – the ranking in terms of how familiar the crayon scent is to adults. 

1962 – the year when Crayola changed the name of their crayon ‘Flesh’ to ‘Peach.’

15 feet – the length of the world’s biggest crayon. 

223 billion – the number of Crayola crayons produced to date. 

730 – the number of crayons used by the average kid by the age of 10. 

“we could learn a lot from crayons; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box.”

-Robert Fulghum, american author

 

 

 

credits: national days

yellow.

Standard

the kinder create with loose parts

dressed all in yellow. 

clearly in their yellow period. 

 

 

“yellow is the color which is closest to light.

we associate the rays of the sun and the stars with it.

it is the radiance of the spirit.”

– ueli seiler-hugova

stick together.

Standard

our rainbow of people

“look at the rainbow, it is made up of different colors, yet they do not split,

because they know how beautiful they are when they stick together.”

Michael Bassey Johnson, Song of a Nature Lover

glitter soup.

Standard

‘glitter soup’ from art candy

years ago, when visiting my daughter in australia, i met her friend jenni gray, (the artist behind art candy), and she has remained a friend to both of us ever since. while visiting, we had tea, a tour of the space where her art happens, and she even let me peek into a drawer filled with glitter. as a lifelong fan of glitter, it was like magic, and what could be better?

over the years, i’ve followed her work, and have become the lucky owner of some of her art. jenni works with mixed media creating beautiful whimsical art and cards. when she told me that her recent piece, named ‘glitter soup’ reminded her of me, i was honored.

                                                     

jenni’s origin story is this: “Art Candy began at art school inspired by a love of language, especially slang, colour and the sheer exuberence of enjoying life !” she has certainly lived up to that and more. take a peek at her work in the link below, it’s sure to put a smile on your face.

Sweetness with soul.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/artcandyaustralia

 

“from soup, comes stars”

what the glitter soup turned into

 

“if art doesn’t make us better, then what on earth is it for?”

-alice walker

pigment.

Standard

In Tokyo, there is an artist’s dream come true: thousands of pigments with names like “Autumn Mystery” and “Luxury Twinkle” line the neat, airy bamboo shelves of a store called Pigment.

Pigment is dry concentrated color dust used to give fabric, ink, plastics, and, of course, paint their hue. By adding a binding agent like oil or glue to the powder, the pigment becomes adhesive. It’s an older style of paint-making as opposed to purchasing paint pre-mixed, but many artists prefer it for its simplicity and versatility. The store also sells other traditional Japanese painting supplies like brushes, papers, frames, natural animal glue, and ink stones.

Pigment the store is just as beautiful as its contents. It was designed by renowned architect Kengo Kuma, whose work connects ancient principles of Japanese art and ideology to the modern day. Much like pigment, it’s simple, natural, and basic but elegant too. The store is made almost entirely of bamboo with gently waving lines, lots of open space, and light. The store does ship art supplies ordered online, but Pigment’s physical store and displays are something to behold.

‘we all have the same palette of emotional paints

it’s how we pigment them on the canvas of life that dictates our artistry.’ 

-ged thompson (liverpool poet)

 

 

 

credits: atlas obscura, pigment, tokyo