Tag Archives: reading

read when right.

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if like me

you find yourself

 collecting  more and more books to be read

never catching up

it’s time for a change in perspective

 relax and let your book guilt go. 

“think not of the books you’ve bought as a ‘to be read’ pile.

instead, think of your bookcase as a wine cellar.

you collect books to be read at the right time, the right place, and the right mood.”

-luc van donkersgoed

 

 

 

photo credit: food and wine magazine

not small things.

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what a wonderful 90 minutes

spent (online) with one of my all-time favorite authors

*fredrik backman.

 public libraries in 37 states hosted this live chat with fredrik

as he continued on a worldwide book tour

for his latest work,  ‘the winners.’

 he spoke openly about his struggles with anxiety

being on the autism spectrum

 the pressures of a success which he never expected

 his wife as his partner and support in all things

her important roles

organizing his promotional side of being an author

helping him to stay grounded

 encouraging him taking as many breaks as needed.

i first became acquainted with his writing with the arrival of his book (and later, film),

‘a man called ove’

and there was no going back.

when he was asked about his writing process in today’s chat,

i found that we have a somewhat similar process.

his reply:

“my process is just chaos. all of these ideas are just in my head, like horses in a burning barn, trying to get out. my brain is always working, hearing a bit of conversation, crossing paths with a stranger, a place i happen into, anything is fair game, and i think, i would love to include those words or that person in my writing. i am always observing, listening, taking it all in, my brain never stops. i have to write an idea down on whatever i can find, an envelope, a scrap of paper, a receipt….then 3 weeks later i’ll make my family insane by asking, “where is that envelope i wrote my idea on a few weeks ago?” i have to scour our whole apartment looking for it and make everyone crazy. i suppose that is my process.”

amazing.

“words are not small things.”

-fredrik backman, beartown

*Fredrik Backman is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of A Man Called OveMy Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s SorryBritt-Marie Was HereBeartownUs Against You, and Anxious People, as well as two novellas and one work of nonfiction. His books are published in more than forty countries. He lives in Stockholm, Sweden, with his wife and two children. Connect with him on Facebook and Twitter @BackmanLand or on Instagram @BackmanSK.

 

 

they have made me.

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The library in Puebla, Mexico has grown from 5,000 volumes in 1646 to more than 40,000 volumes now,

the majority of which date from before Mexico’s independence and is the oldest in the Americas.

 

“i cannot remember the books i’ve read any more than the meals i have eaten; even so, they have made me.”

-ralph waldo emerson

 

 

in honor of international book month

journey.

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If you have no intention of loving or being loved, then the whole journey is pointless.”
“no book is really worth reading at the age of ten
which is not equally – and often far more –
worth reading at the age of 50 and beyond.”
-c.s. lewis
credits: author- kate dicamillo, candlewick press

story about the stories.

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on this special day

i brought out

an old treasured story 

written by

my former student, nicole

who i taught for grades k-2

(in a school where we were known by our first names)

 a story about me sharing stories

 made me cry happy tears to read

how much she enjoyed the stories

what ginormous heaps of praise

from a fellow roald dahl fan. 

happy roald dahl story day!!

“words are our most inexhaustible source of magic.”

-albus dumbledore (j.k. rowling, harry potter series)

because i read.

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oh, how i love these tiny places

filled with books are just waiting to be discovered.

“i have lived a thousand lives and have loved a thousand loves.

i’ve walked on distant worlds and seen the end of time, because i read.”

-george r.r. martin

 

 

 

 

 

glen arbor, michigan, usa – summer 2022

 

hard wood.

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the class discovered this tree with magical writing all over it
and even though he’s only mastered the alphabet this year
‘a’ chose to read it out loud to everyone
in his own magical language
a master translator at work.
“he was made of hard wood.”
-hungarian proverb
Arborglyphs, dendroglyphs, silvaglyphs or modified cultural trees
is the carving of shapes and symbols into the bark of living trees.

nancy at 90ish.

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Happy 92nd birthday to Nancy Drew! The first volume in the long-running girl detective series, “The Secret of the Old Clock,” was published 92 years ago under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene. In a tribute to the iconic sleuth, author Theodore Jefferson writes, “Agency. It is that which forms the foundation for any hero’s ability to save the day. In America, agency for teenage girls in literature made its debut in 1930 in the person of Nancy Drew.” This original Mighty Girl character paved the way for many more heroic female characters and inspired generations of real-life girls and women.

Ghostwritten by Mildred Wirt Benson and later revised by Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, the first volume of Nancy Drew had a huge influence on young readers. Nancy Drew provided them with “stories of someone like themselves who had a positive effect on the world instead of passively sitting at home… She is a character with that magical ‘what if’ question woven into her identity, and one that effortlessly captures the imaginations of readers by allowing them to participate in a world where the answers to that question are just as entertaining as the stories themselves.”

At the time, some viewed Nancy Drew as a poor role model, “contradicting adults while she squared off with the villains… she is mechanically inclined and at the same time doesn’t act like most people in the 1930s would have expected a teenage girl to act.” In fact, many libraries and bookstores refused to carry the Nancy Drew stories. Despite — or because of — that disapproval, kids collected the books voraciously, and in the midst of the Depression, used copies were shared and traded like trading cards are today. As a result, “any kid, even those who couldn’t afford new books, would very likely get to read every adventure starring their favorite character.”

The tremendous influence of Nancy Drew continues to this day asserts Jefferson: “It is difficult to overstate how powerful Nancy Drew’s presence remains in literature and in other media. She has influenced film, comics, video games and animation for [90] years, and will continue to do so as long as teenage girls take the lead as our heroes in the imaginative worlds of adventure.”

i loved this book series and it inspired me to be part of a neighborhood gang of childhood detectives

(the four crows – see my post below)

and i am still a huge fan of true crime, not as a criminal,

but in trying to solve the who’s, why’s, and how’s.

https://ididnthavemyglasseson.com/?s=four+crows

On leaving work, at work…

“I don’t promise to forget the mystery, but I know I’ll have a marvelous time.”

-nancy drew

 

credits: theodore jefferson, the mary sue, mighty girl