Tag Archives: storytelling

to the poets.

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Wole Soyinka, playwright, poet and Nobel Laureate, reads an original poem written for children at the high-level meeting of the General Assembly on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Celebrating the linguistic expression

of our common humanity

Poetry reaffirms our common humanity by revealing to us that individuals, everywhere in the world, share the same questions and feelings. Poetry is the mainstay of oral tradition and, over centuries, can communicate the innermost values of diverse cultures.

In celebrating World Poetry Day, March 21, UNESCO recognizes the unique ability of poetry to capture the creative spirit of the human mind.

A decision to proclaim March 21 as World Poetry Day was adopted during UNESCO’s 30th session held in Paris in 1999.

One of the main objectives of the Day is to support linguistic diversity through poetic expression and to offer endangered languages the opportunity to be heard within their communities.

The observance of World Poetry Day is also meant to encourage a return to the oral tradition of poetry recitals, to promote the teaching of poetry, to restore a dialogue between poetry and the other arts such as theatre, dance, music and painting, to support small publishers and create an attractive image of poetry in the media, so that the art of poetry will no longer be considered an outdated form of art, but one which enables society as a whole to regain and assert its identity. As poetry continues to bring people together across continents, all are invited to join in.

“poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.”

-robert frost

 

 

 

credits: photo: UN Photo/Mark Garten, UNESCO

storybook trail.

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such a wonderful discovery made

when walking in a park near my daughter’s house

an illustrated storybook trail

with pages spread throughout the woods

placed there by the village and the local library

a perfect pairing.

“we tell stories in order to feel at home in the universe.”
— Roger Bingham, British science communicator, writer, public television producer and host

comfort.

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 we lie around

on a rainy afternoon

listening to the radio

to hear

one of us

a first-time storyteller on npr

as she shares with the nation

her bittersweet tale

there are 11 people of all ages

4 dogs of all shapes

with all

the food, drinks, games

and

good cheer

we could possibly need

and no timeline or agenda

on this long lazy weekend

all tucked in together

in 1 cozy house

on 1 pretty lake

and all that

equals

1 huge level of comfort.

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it is one of the blessings of old friends

that you can afford to be stupid with them.

– ralph waldo emerson

stories told here

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     had an interesting conversation with my friend. we took turns coming up with one word that defined each of us, and he immediately blurted out the following word that he felt was me: rigmarole.while i had a somewhat negative image of what this word meant, i always liked the sound of it and it was an interesting word to say the least. i decided to look it up for further clarification. after referring to a traditional source, the oxford english dictionary, i found that i rather liked the definition, appreciated the origin of the word, and finally, embraced it as my own. i took it to mean that i simply live life, with all of its complications, and i share my stories, and though not all are long and rambling, i’m quite happy with that. 

rigmarole

Syllabification: (rig·ma·role)

Pronunciation: /ˈrig(ə)məˌrōl/

noun [usually in singular]

  • a lengthy and complicated procedure: she went through the rigmarole of securing the front door
  • a long, rambling story or statement. 

Origin:

mid 18th century: apparently an alteration of ragman roll, originally denoting a legal document recording a list of offenses

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Stories are a communal currency of humanity. – Tahir Shah