Tag Archives: family

stuck.

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while shopping at target recently

i found myself in a long, slow, self-checkout line

behind a family of three-

a tired after a long day looking mother

 a perky tween daughter

and a high-energy young son

who was clearly bored and restless.

needing to create something to do

the young son

somehow found a way to

push his head through the middle of the skeleton wreath

that they were waiting to purchase.

 due to the crazy universal law of

‘on is easier than off’

he could not get it

back over his head to take it off again.

first he tried to get it off himself,

then his sister joined in,

when she heard his yelping

mom turned around, sighed, put her things down, and proceeded to help

looking at her wits end

as they patiently worked their way toward the front of the snaking line

continuing to struggle with the skeleton wreath removal project.

when they finally were in the front

mom asked the store clerk if she could scan the wreath while he was still wearing it

and deal with getting it off after they purchased it

she got the go ahead, scanned it on his neck, along with all her other items

and moved out of line.

employees quickly jumped in to help

 with one holding his ears flat,

another tilting the wreath in a variety of positions,

his mother putting lotion on his face

moving his head up and down,

and his sister trying to keep him calm.

when they were finally able to free his head from the wreath

he stopped crying

mom quietly pushed her cart out of the store

her son carrying the wreath

his sister holding his hand

looking like they were all more than ready to head home. 

“there is no panic like the panic when you momentarily feel

when you get your hand or head stuck in something.”

-peter kay

serenade.

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a warm welcome from mother nature

walking with

2 grands

through

1 park

1 forest

finding

3 sister lakes

mother nature

and

forest daddy

a family affair.

3rd sister lake

“In memory of “Daddy” Filbert Roth

Head of Forestry School (UM)

1902-1923

By his Forestry Boys

 

“nature is a serenade for souls willing to hear.”

-saba k.

 

Dolph Park,  Saginaw Forest, 3 Sister Lakes – Ann Arbor, MI, USA

June 2021

yeti is home.

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this baby yeti

who was abandoned and rescued

from a box in a park near the woods

has come home to live with us

named by my daughter

because, apparently 

i talk about yetis a bit more than most people in the world

also because he is furry and white and found near the woods

yeti is sweet and happy and purring and exploring

tomorrow he’ll meet olive.

 

“and on the subject of naming animals,

can I just say how happy I was to discover that the word yeti,

literally translated, apparently means “that thing over there.”

“Quick, brave Himalayan Guide – what’s that thing over there?”

Yeti.”

“I see.”)

 Neil Gaiman

names.

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not me sitting with my three daughters

but hired meercat models looking very similar

after i’ve just called each of them by one or more of their sibling’s names once again

since for some reason i thought it was a good idea to name all of them with the same first letter 

(i’m a fan of alliteration)

and with two syllables

and rarely have called them by the correct name on the first try since birth

so they each pretty much answer to all of them. 

According to Quartz Magazine, if you’re in a particularly bad mood, getting called by your sibling’s name might make you feel like the offending parent doesn’t care enough to keep their kids straight. But according to a 2016 study published in the journal Memory and Cognition, your parents might actually mistake you for your siblings because they care about you.

A team of students in Duke University’s Department of Psychology and Neuroscience conducted a series of surveys to find out who gets misnamed, who misnames them, and why it happens. Some instances appeared to have been caused by phonetic similarities between names—e.g. you accidentally called your boss “Katherine” (your cousin’s name) instead of “Kathleen.” But the survey results also pointed to strong semantic trends. In other words, family members are often called other family members’ names, friends are often called other friends’ names, and people outside those two categories are often mistaken for other people outside them.

Basically, as the researchers explained, we build semantic networks in our brains where we can group similar information together and recall it easily. Facts about your immediate family members, for example, may be stored in one semantic network; while details about friends might go in another one. In your mom’s mind, then, your and your sister’s names are essentially in the same basket, and your mom might unwittingly grab your sister’s when she meant to grab yours. What the researchers argue is that it’s a little less about the mistake and more about the basket: Parents love their kids, so they put you all in the same top-tier basket.

The results also suggest that some family member baskets aren’t just reserved for humans. A staggering 41 of the 42 pet-related misnaming incidents involved calling pets by family members’ names or vice versa, rather than mixing up two pets’ names. And most of those incidents involved dogs, specifically.

“Given the scarcity of misnaming episodes involving the names of family pets other than dogs, our data suggest that dogs may be a central part of (at least some) families … as human-like members, whereas cats and other pets, although they may be part of the family, are not categorized as human-like,” the authors wrote in the study.

If you’re about to get defensive on behalf of your cat, whom you very much consider a human-like part of your family, keep in mind that 42 is a small sample size. And the whole study only included about 1700 participants, who were all reporting misnaming episodes remembered from their past—leaving plenty of room for human error. In short, as is so often the case with scientific studies, more research is needed. That said, try not to take it personally if your dad mistakes you for the dog.

 

“i cannot tell what the dickens his name is.”

-william shakespeare

Story credits: Quartz Magazine -By Samantha A. Deffler, Christin M. Ogle, Cassidy Fox, and David C. Rubin

Current and former members of the Noetics Laboratory at Duke University

variety is the sugar of life.

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these were one of the greatest food creations of my childhood

with the introduction of the mini-box variety packs

came great excitement

along with

new reasons to battle with siblings

how to divide the number of boxes evenly

who gets to pick first

did i open it correctly on the perforated lines 

kellogs, general mills, or post packs

who gets stuck with

the ‘old boring people’s cereal boxes’

 such unparalleled joy

sprung from eating it right out of the side of the box

pouring your milk on this sugary delight

turning it into a personal bowl

i thought i could never be happier.

 

“do you know what breakfast cereal is made of?

it’s made of all those little curly wooden shavings you find in pencil sharpeners!”

-roald dahl