Tag Archives: writer

yet one more.

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that surprising and wonderful moment

when you discover

there is yet one more unread book

written by one of your favorite authors

hiding in plain sight

waiting for you to pick it up.

 

“books are for nothing but to inspire”
– ralph waldo emerson

writing out loud.

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(not me, but we could easily pass as sisters)

for some reason

after almost 8 years of blogging

and never questioning it

I only recently discovered

what the word ‘blog’ actually means. 

Blog is another word for weblog.

A weblog is a website that is like a diary or journal. …

Bloggers often write about their opinions and thoughts.

A blog containing video material is called a video blog or video log,

usually shortened to vlog.

“Blogging is to writing what extreme sports are to athletics: more free-form, more accident-prone, less formal, more alive. It is, in many ways, writing out loud.” For most of human history, all published writing had been carefully inspected, edited, and approved. In the last decade, blogging has turned the publishing world on its head. A blog allows you to write and publish anything, from anywhere, and have it be immediately available to billions of people all around the world.”  -Andrew Sullivan, the Atlantic

. I, for one, am happy to embrace the chaos and vitality.

 

rebuttal on february 3rd.

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I’ve been keeping a diary for thirty-three years and write in it every morning.

Most of it’s just whining,

but every so often there’ll be something I can use later:

a joke, a description, a quote.

It’s an invaluable aid when it comes to winning arguments.

‘That’s not what you said on February 3, 1996,’ I’ll say to someone.

-david sedaris

 

 

image credit: connecticut public radio

sci-fi or reality tv?

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 Rod Serling – working at home in Connecticut, 1956

anti-war and social justice activist, tv-writer, producer, narrator

and one of my idols. 

*In 1955, the miscarriage of justice in the Emmett Till case proved a galvanizing point in the Civil Rights Movement. Rod Serling, a 30-year-old rising star in a golden age of dramatic television, watched the events play out in the news. He believed firmly in the burgeoning medium’s power for social justice. “The writer’s role is to be a menacer of the public’s conscience,” Serling later said. “He must have a position, a point of view. He must see the arts as a vehicle of social criticism and he must focus the issues of his time.”

Soon after the trial concluded, Serling, riding off the success of his most well-received teleplay to date, felt compelled write a teleplay around the racism that led to Till’s murder. But the censorship that followed by advertisers and networks, fearful of blowback from white, Southern audiences, forced Serling to rethink his approach. His response, ultimately, was “The Twilight Zone,” the iconic sci-fi anthology series that spoke truth to the era’s social ills and tackled themes of prejudice, bigotry, nuclear fears, war, among so many others. At this point in history, the censors didn’t know what to make of this genre and he was free to deliver his message in a new way.

in honor of Rod Serling on national science fiction day,

who understood the power of the arts

as a way to communicate important messages. 

“there are weapons that are simply thoughts.

for the record, prejudices can kill and suspicion can destroy.”

-rod serling

 

credits: Getty Images, *Smithsonian Magazine

april one.

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“the exact day I became a poet was april 1, 1965,

the day I bought my first typewriter.”

-august wilson 

 

in honor of poetry month.

mine was the day I learned to hold a pencil

and found a scrap of paper to scribble on.

 

 

 

image credit: daskeyboard

gates.

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Mexican journalist freed by ICE, joins University of Michigan as fellow

 After being detained at an immigrant detention center for nearly eight months, Mexican journalist Emilio Gutierrez Soto will join the 2018-19 Knight-Wallace Fellowships for Journalists class at the University of Michigan. Gutierrez, who will be a Senior Press Freedom Fellow at Wallace House, and his son, Oscar, were freed July 26 from a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility in Texas.

“With so many challenges to press freedom, and in the midst of a crisis around immigration policy, it is easy to feel powerless,” said Knight-Wallace Fellowship director Lynette Clemetson, who met with Gutierrez in April at the El Paso, Texas detention facility to invite him to join the program. “Emilio’s release, due to the efforts of many, is a reminder that we all can do something to effect change.”

Gutierrez and his son were released a day before a federal judge’s deadline for U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials to produce documents explaining why the journalist was detained. Though Gutierrez was released by ICE, he has not been granted asylum, National Press Club Freedom Fellow Kathy Kiely said.

“We’re extremely happy, but there was no settlement agreement reached,” Kiely said. “We have been talking to the government about settling the case and discussing the terms of the settlement, but they never responded to that. In the end, they didn’t agree to anything, they just released him.  On July 10, the judge issued an order citing constitutional protections of free speech and press freedom in raising concerns about immigration officials’ treatment of Gutierrez.

In 2017, an immigration judge in El Paso denied Gutierrez’s asylum request and he was scheduled for deportation. The deportation was halted after protests from numerous journalism organizations including The National Press Club, Reporters Without Borders and the American Society of News Editors.

Gutierrez entered the country 10 years ago seeking asylum after his reporting on corruption in his home country made him the target of death threats. He and his son had been held in an ICE detention facility near El Paso, Texas since December. He was previously denied asylum and is still in the process of scheduling an appeal.

“He did everything that the immigration officials say refugees should do,” Kiely said. “He came in through a port of entry, he declared himself, asked for asylum, he’s gone to every immigration check-in. Why are they spending so much of our taxpayer resources if he’s not a bad guy?” While Gutierrez’s asylum status remains unclear, plans are moving forward for him to be a part of the fellowship at UM in the fall, Kiely said.

“Wallace House, the University of Michigan and the Ann Arbor community are eager to receive Gutierrez and his son as the family works to resume their life in the U.S. and Gutierrez has the opportunity to reconnect with journalism,” Clemetson said.

The Knight-Wallace Fellowships for Journalists is one of several organizations that signed amicus briefs organized by The National Press Club in support of Gutierrez’s case. While at UM, Gutierrez will study issues related to global press freedom and safety.

“it is useless to close the gates against ideas: they overlap them.”

-klemens von metternich

 

 

 

 credits: martin slagder, ann arbor news, m-live, reporters without borders

journos.

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“ann arbor news reporter stan bradshaw

leaves building front door for assignment, september 1948″.


this old news image reflects the one we often had of intrepid reporters, hot on an assignment, giving us the latest news of pinnacle events in the life of ann arbor. there was a certain quality and reliability to the news and its staff, bringing us the best stories and photographs available. the photos still resonate with the innocence and spontaneity of life and those living it here.

“journalism keeps you planted in the earth.”

-ray bradbury

to all the journos out there, still finding a way to tell the story.

 

 

 

 

 

image credits: oldnews.aadl.org, ann arbor townies