Tag Archives: seasons

up all night.

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a glimpse into the real story behind the legend.

 the groundhog

stays up all night

trying to calculate

exactly when spring will arrive

and is exhausted

when they wake him up

to bring him out

early in the morning

for his official prediction

each february 2nd

on groundhog day.

“i’m so tired…i was up all night trying to round off infinity.”

-steven wright

 

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hurry up summer!

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“spring passes and one remembers one’s innocence.
summer passes and one remembers one’s exuberance.
autumn passes and one remembers one’s reverence.
winter passes and one remembers one’s perseverance.”
-yoko ono

 

 

argo pond at argo park, ann arbor, michigan, usa – summer 2017

the time being.

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and once again

daylight savings time comes to an end.

for the time being.

“do not think that time simply flies away. do not understand “flying” as the only function of time. if time simply flew away, a separation would exist between you and time. so if you understand time as only passing, then you do not understand the time being. to grasp this truly, every being that exists in the entire world is linked together as moments in time, and at the same time they exist as individual moments of time. because all moments are the time being, they are your time being.”

―  13th-century Zen master Dogen Zenji, as quoted by ruth ozeki – A Tale for the Time Being

image credit: david pearson- antique time spiral

 

falling.

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fall is only ‘fall’ to americans, even though the term was coined in britain.

what do you call the picking of ripe sweet potatoes, apples, squash and pumpkins?

harvest.

that was the word used until the 1300s to describe the next few months of weather.

because “harvest” also meant the gathering of ripe crops, when the word “autumn” showed up in english writing, its popularity soared.

some time after, poets coined the phrase “the fall of leaves” — shortened to “fall” in the 1600s.

the word “autumn” still remained popular throughout england’s period of colonizing the world.

the lack of consistent communication between the english and the people in the american colonies led to differences in the language.

by the mid-1800s, the word “fall” had firmly rooted itself in america.

and apparently something was again lost in translation

when communicating with mother nature

as yesterday was the official first day of 

fall/harvest/autumn

and our temps in michigan were in the 90s. 

(photo: fuller park, ann arbor, mi, usa)

 

 

 

credit: cnn news