Tag Archives: creativity

common ground.

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my class has recently become enamored with a giant box of dinos

they play with them every day

create wildly imaginative scenarios

ask questions about real dinos

reassure me that the ones in our room are not real

one day when playing, a child asked

“would they wear masks if they were alive now?”

another jumped up to say

“never, ever, ever, ever, try to put a mask on a t-rex!!!!”

and an instant class book was born

what a brilliant title

others jumped in to offer reasons why you shouldn’t try to mask one

brainstorming was in full swing

some became illustrators

 it is a fascinating and funny work in progress.

dinos may have left the earth forever, but books will never die.

“stories are the common ground that allow people to connect, despite all our defenses and all our differences.”

-kate forsyth

3am.

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3 am is the hour of writers,

painters, poets, musicians, silence seekers,

over-thinkers, and creative people.

We know who you are,

We can see your light on.

Keep on keeping on.

-author unknown

 

 

 

 

 

image credit: pinterest – vintage

 

 

 

all artists.

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love wandering around the town

discovering artists’ work

left in unexpected places

a sudden inspiration

using what they found

 

“i don’t think there’s anything in this universe as powerful as the power of an artist to create.

by that logic, we are all artists, aren’t we?”

-malcolm fernandes

sheepish.

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 art from discarded loose parts – recycled phones and cords

 

“it’s not where you take things from – it’s where you take them to.”

-jean-luc godard

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image credit: *telephone sheep by jean luc cornec, artists without borders

*ArtistJean Luc has put old landline telephones to good use with his sculptures titled “Telephone Sheep”. The series explores how fast technology is moving and how we can put old things to good use. The sculptures use the hand dialing base as the head, the cords as their wool and the earpiece as their feet. The “Telephone Sheep” exhibit was displayed at the Museum of Telecommunication in Frankfurt.

greater than.

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that moment

when you go to the grocery

to get some ice

for your food

after a wild and windy rainstorm

knocked your power out

 you pull out your bags of ice

only to find

a secret ice cream stash

placed there by a brilliant grocery worker

hidden for later

and your day is made.

 

 

“greater than the tread of mighty armies is an idea whose time has come.”

-victor hugo 

from bored to board.

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Before Professor Plum, Miss Scarlett and Colonel Mustard gathered on a game board to claim their first victim—wielding a revolver, a rope or a lead pipe -British musician Anthony Pratt was watching murder-mystery scenarios unfold in European country mansions, where he played piano. Long before that game board became a global multi-million-seller and was inducted into the Toy Hall of Fame, Pratt was taking mental notes as guests in these elegant homes play-acted dastardly crimes involving skulking, shrieking, and falling ‘dead’ to the floor.

Years later, during World War II, Pratt recreated those murder-mystery parlor games in miniature, as a board game called Murder! (later Clue). The longtime Birmingham resident, who worked in a local munitions factory during the war, invented the suspects and weapons between 1943 and 1945, as a way to pass the long nights stuck indoors during air-raid blackouts. His wife, Elva, assisted, designing it on their dining-room table.

By that time, Pratt had become something of a crime aficionado. HIs daughter Marcia Davies said her father was an avid reader of murder fiction by Raymond Chandler and others. “He was fascinated by the criminal mind,” Davies said of her father. “When I was little he was forever pointing out sites of famous murders to me.”

In 1947, Pratt patented and sold it to a U.K.-based game manufacturer named Waddington’s and its American counterpart, Parker Brothers. But because of post-war shortages the game was not released until 1949—as Cluedo in England and Clue in the United States. In both versions, the object is for players to collect clues to figure out the murder suspect, weapon and location. The game took place in a Victorian mansion. The victim’s name? Mr. Boddy.

Cluedo inventor Anthony Pratt
“is it worse to be scared than to be bored? – that is the question.”
gertrude stein