Tag Archives: book

walk around in it.

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“you never really understand a person

until you consider things from his point of view…

until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.”

― harper lee, to kill a mockingbird

57 years ago this month, in july, 1960,

‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was first published.

one of my favorite books.

 

 

credits: universal pictures, j.b. lippincott & co., harper lee

 

spill simmer falter wither.

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 ‘spill simmer falter wither,’ the debut novel by irish author, sara baume

is a devastating, and at the same time, beautiful, ode to empathy, to humanity and to the outliers of the world.

this is not your usual story of a man and his dog.  

instead, it’s a 200+ page lyrical poem, with a lot of dark moments, and a few glimpses of light.

as it moves through the seasons, you will come to understand what led them to become who they are.

this is the story of a person and an animal

who most people would pass by without giving them a second thought.

after reading this book, i cannot stop thinking about them. 

“i realise that you were not born with a predetermined capacity for wonder, as i’d believed.

i realise that you fed it up yourself from tiny pieces of the world.

i realise it’s up to me to follow your example and nurture my own wonder, morsel by morsel by morsel.”

― sara baume

image credit: marinerbooks.com, sara baume,spill simmer falter wither

bookstock.

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spent a late afternoon 

browsing through this collection of

used books of all sorts

went home with unexpected treasures

and things to look forward to

kind of like woodstock

but without

the mud, tie dye, or music

just lots of good words.

The Bookstock Fund was created from the revenue of each year’s Bookstock sale and donations. Focused on enhancing literacy throughout Detroit and the metropolitan area, each year the Fund looks for community partners doing inspiring and life-changing work on the individual, family, and organizational level.

“it is what you read when you don’t have to that determines what you will be when you can’t help it.”
― oscar wilde

tumbleweeds.

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shakespeare-book-shop

The Historic Parisian Bookshop Where Aspiring Writers Can Spend the Night for Free

Shakespeare and Company opened its doors back in 1951, and ever since then, it’s hosted aspiring writers for free. And it’s not always just for a night, sometimes, guests stay for months, and they don’t have to pay a penny. The Parisian literary hub may be the only bookshop in the world of its kind.

More than 30,000 guests have stayed at the bookshop since American expat George Whitman opened it over six decades ago, and many of them have even gone on to become international best sellers.

Molly Dektar, who lived at Shakespeare and Company in January and June 2013, wrote about the experience: “I aimed to read a book a day but it wasn’t entirely possible. Still, the goal is spiritually important and should be taken seriously. One minute I was a visitor just like any other,” she added, “and the next minute I was welcomed in to this huge, historic community of writers and expatriates.”

molly-bookshop

Now, 65 years after the bookshop opened, the owner, Whitman’s daughter Sylvia, has released a memoir documenting its long history. Whitman was inspired by American expat Sylvia Beach, who owned a bookshop by the same name at another location, which existed between 1919 and 1941.

Beach’s bookshop had been a popular and frequent gathering place for legendary writers like Ernest Hemingway, F Scott Fitzgerald and T S Eliot. She had also been the first to publish James Joyce’s Ulysses in 1922.

Whitman had called his version of the bookshop a “spiritual successor” and it quick became the center of expat life in Paris for the book writing crowd. As he’d been the recipient of the generosity of strangers while traveling the world, he decided that he wanted to do the same for other travelers. Since the start, his store has hosted overnight guests he refers to as “Tumbleweeds.” Instead of paying for their stay, the “Tumbleweeds” are just required to help out in the shop for a few hours, write a one-page autobiography for the archives and “read a book a day.” Quite the deal!

While Whitman passed away five years ago, his daughter Sylvia is continuing to carry on the tradition and runs the bookshop with her partner, David Delannet.

Today, as many as six Tumbleweeds can sleep in the bookshop each night, but it now also hosts an adjoining cafe, a literary festival and a publishing arm of Shakespeare and Company, which just released a book on the history of the company.

Of the book, Delannet said, “This history offers readers a unique perspective on Paris, as well as an insight into the life of the literary traveler in the second half of the 20th century and a feel for a bookshop whose motto is ‘Be not inhospitable to strangers lest they be angels in disguise.'”

credits: earthables, molly dektar, buzzfeed

 

big words.

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she’s a big girl of 5 now

and wants 

so desperately 

to read chapter books

all by herself

with lots and lots of pages

 no pictures

no help

flipping through the pages

looking for familiar letters

seeking any word she’s seen before

putting her bookmark in 

taking it out again

opening it

closing it

showing us how thick it is

doing all the things that readers do

so self-assured

‘i can read them all.’

and then 

 her moment of truth and grace arrives

  as she says

isn’t it funny, there isn’t one interesting word in here?’

there are many little ways to enlarge your child’s world.

love of books is the best of all.

– jackie kennedy