Tag Archives: sun

warmer.

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back in the parks today 

 under a sparkling sun

with

happy smiling people

and

playful animals

warmer. 

“spring will come and so will happiness. hold on. life will get warmer.”

-Anita Krizzan

 

 

 

huron river, gallup park, ann arbor, mi, usa

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crisp.

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as our temps take a dip into the zero-ish range,

it is good to remember the importance of connection,

the joy of giving to others, and the comfort of the sun.

“it is the life of the crystal, the architect of the flake,

the fire of the frost, the soul of the sunbeam.

this crisp winter air is full of it.”

~john burroughs, “Winter Sunshine”

 

painting by: francesca rizzato – ‘Winter’s Tale’

 

 

 

light.

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image
Barrow, Alaska in darkness on Monday

On Friday, the sun set for the final time in Barrow, Alaska, as the city plunges into polar darkness for the next two months and, in December, formally changes its name to Utqiaġvik, according to Alaska Dispatch News.

The next dawn in Utqiaġvik will be January 22, 2017, the first sunlight under its new name, an Inupiaq word that the wider area of Barrow has long gone by. The city of around 4,300 was incorporated in 1958 and originally took its name from nearby Point Barrow, named by a Royal Navy officer in 1825.

The city is the northernmost in the U.S. and each year spends a couple of months in darkness, owing to its position hundreds of miles north of the Arctic Circle, and about 2,000 miles northwest of Seattle.

Residents recently voted to permanently change the town’s name to honor indigenous peoples and the area’s roots. Locals seem relaxed about Barrow’s final sunset. As ADN reports, the sun “was nowhere to be seen” on Friday, and Qaiyaan Harcharek, a Barrow City Council member who led the drive to change the name, said the event didn’t have much of an effect on him.  “I didn’t put much thought to it,” Harcharek told ADN.

“hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.”

-desmond tutu

credits: alaska dispatch news, erik shilling, university of alaska- fairbanks, atlas obscura