Tag Archives: mail

exchange.

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staff members of the slovak and slovenian embassies meet once a month to exchange incorrectly addressed mail.

close enough, but alas, two very different places. 

i should organize this with my neighbors.

‘i believe that the open exchange of information can have a positive global impact.”

-biz stone

credit: mental floss

* kemst po haegt fari.

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                                        in iceland, drawing a map on your mail works just as well as an address

iceland is a magical place, where peace reigns and elves dictate where roads can be built and a mcDonald’s burger can end up in the country’s national museum. it’s also the kind of place where if you don’t know the address where you want your mail to go, you can just draw a map, as condé nast traveler reports.

a tourist looking to mail an envelope to a farm in the village of búðardalur in western iceland didn’t know the proper postal address, so instead, the visitor just drew a sketch of the location. the outside of the letter included pertinent details like the town name, descriptions like “a horse farm with an icelandic/danish couple and 3 kids and a lot of sheep” and the fact that “the danish woman works in a supermarket in búðardalur.” the envelope mapped out local highway routes and bodies of water in relation to the farm. it also included a hefty “takk fyrir!,” icelandic for “thank you.” the letter departed from reykjavik, and by the grace of very patient icelandic postal workers, did end up at its intended destination, the hólar farm and petting zoo. it must be quite the place to earn such dedication from its visitors.

* kemst þó hægt fari.
translation: you will reach your destination even though you travel slowly.
english equivalent: we rode slow, but we ride sure.


source: Íslands, Landsbókasafn (1980). Árbók. Bókasafnið

credits: mentalfloss.com-shaunacy ferro, conde-nast magazine, steina matt (image)

 

the lost art – part deux

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after yesterday’s post, a few of you asked to see this piece of art that went on a long, disjointed journey as it made its way to my house.  somehow, this whimsical pastel bunny made it all the away across the ocean from poland and then through a maze of american post office locations and crazy systems and insane red tape, all to finally land upon my wall. for that i am happy. 

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“Strange as it may seem, I still hope for the best, even though the best, like an interesting piece of mail, so rarely arrives, and even when it does it can be lost so easily.”  ― Lemony SnicketThe Beatrice Letters