Tag Archives: island

cloudy, with a chance of sheep.

Standard

Litla Dimun, an isolated island often capped by its own fluffy cloud.

Lítla Dímun is the smallest of the Faroe Islands’ 18 main islands. But though it may be tiny, the islet still has the power to influence the atmosphere.

A lenticular cloud often drapes over it like a wet, vapory blanket. These stationary clouds typically form over mountain peaks or other protruding landmasses. Lítla Dímun’s lenticular hovers above its top, occasionally spilling down over the land as it reaches toward the cold sea. Of the Faroe Islands’ main islands, the little landmass is the only one that remains uninhabited by humans. But people do visit the island. For centuries, Faroese farmers have made the precarious journey to Lítla Dímun to tend to the creatures who rule the islet: its sheep.

Up until the middle of the 19th century, Lítla Dímun sheep ruled the little green haven. It’s believed these black, short-tailed feral sheep were the descendants of the animals brought to the area during the Neolithic era. But after the last of these rare creatures was shot in the 1800s, rendering the bloodline extinct, the island became home to domesticated Faroes sheep. Every fall, farmers head to Lítla Dímun, scale its slick cliffs, and round up the sheep to bring them back to the main islands.

You’ll most likely have to stick to admiring this island from the villages of Hvalba and Sandvík on the island of Suðuroy. It is possible to visit Lítla Dímun, though it’s rare to have weather that’s good enough to make a visit feasible, as you must use the ropes left by the farmers to help climb the cliffs.

“listen to the silence, be still, and let your soul catch up.”
-scottish proverb

just room enough.

Standard

In order to be considered an island in this region, land must be larger than one square foot, it must remain above the water level year round, and it must sustain at least one tree. Welcome to Just Room Enough Island.

Part of the 2,000-isle-strong Thousand Islands chain in New York, this tiny land mass meets the official criteria. It was purchased in the 1950s by the Sizeland family who were looking to create a holiday getaway.

They built the walls right up to the edges of the island, giving the island its quirky name. A pair of bench chairs were placed in front of the home and there was also a tree growing on one side. And that is all the room the island had.

While the Sizelands had hoped for their quirky little getaway to be a nice respite from the hustle and bustle of city life, it soon attracted hordes of sightseers and tourists who broke their placid solitude.

When islands get really small they sometimes barely even count as islands, and so some places actually have criteria that the landforms must meet to be officially considered islands, and not just crappy little scraps of land. Just Room Enough Island meets these standards just barely, but really it’s more house than island.

“just when i thought there wasn’t room enough

for another thought in my head,

i had this great idea -“

-john ashberry

 

credit: atlas obscura

$49.

Standard

With a $49 Raffle Ticket,

You Could Win an Island Resort in Micronesia

kuramathi-resort-luxury-villa-1440
if you’ve ever dreamed of giving it all up

to go live on a tropical island somewhere,

we may have found your one-way ticket

—as well as your future career.

As Condé Nast Traveler reports, Doug and Sally Beitz are giving away the Kosrae Nautilus Resort, which the couple has run for the last 22 years. With the purchase of a $49 raffle ticket, you’ll be entered in a lottery that will be drawn on July 26. The winner becomes the 100 percent owner of the 16-bedroom hotel located on Micronesia’s Kosrae Island. It’s an enterprise that, according to the raffle website, is “debt free,” and the resort features a swimming pool, private beach, fully-stocked restaurant, and SCUBA dive operation. The winner also inherits $10,000 in the company bank account. There’s just one caveat: If fewer than 50,000 tickets are sold, the resort is off the market and the Beitzs will split the money from the lottery with the winner.

Why in the world would the innkeepers abandon a life of island bliss? “We’ve had our time in the sun and enjoyed a career most people would never even dare dream about, but our current goal now is to become professional grandparents,” Doug Beitz says on the contest website. “We feel like a new chapter in our lives is beginning, and we’re ready to pass the baton to someone else.”

credits: mentalfloss, caitlin schneider, conde nast traveler, kosrae nautilus resort