Tag Archives: darkness

light.

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hell’s kitchen at night, new york

“hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.”

-desmond tutu

 

 

 

 

new york, ny, usa – nonmember 2018

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where some see light, others see night.

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The City of Ann Arbor Government
and the 
US National Weather Service – Detroit
issued this statement yesterday:

 

We lost 38 seconds of daylight yesterday. By the end of the month, we’ll be losing over 2 minutes each day and by the end of next month, nearly 20 minutes per week. Here’s what you can expect as you savor the waning days of Michigan’s warm season:

July: -45 minutes lost
August: -1 hour 16 minutes lost
September: -1 hour 22 minutes lost
October: -1 hour 23 minutes lost
November: -1 hour 1 minute lost

It won’t be long until you have an extra 6 hours of darkness to spend on your indoor hobbies. Have a great Monday.

i think that someone may have been very hot and had a tough monday.
“we’re burnin’ daylight.”

-john wayne

image credit: kur4

 

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Barrow, Alaska in darkness on Monday

On Friday, the sun set for the final time in Barrow, Alaska, as the city plunges into polar darkness for the next two months and, in December, formally changes its name to Utqiaġvik, according to Alaska Dispatch News.

The next dawn in Utqiaġvik will be January 22, 2017, the first sunlight under its new name, an Inupiaq word that the wider area of Barrow has long gone by. The city of around 4,300 was incorporated in 1958 and originally took its name from nearby Point Barrow, named by a Royal Navy officer in 1825.

The city is the northernmost in the U.S. and each year spends a couple of months in darkness, owing to its position hundreds of miles north of the Arctic Circle, and about 2,000 miles northwest of Seattle.

Residents recently voted to permanently change the town’s name to honor indigenous peoples and the area’s roots. Locals seem relaxed about Barrow’s final sunset. As ADN reports, the sun “was nowhere to be seen” on Friday, and Qaiyaan Harcharek, a Barrow City Council member who led the drive to change the name, said the event didn’t have much of an effect on him.  “I didn’t put much thought to it,” Harcharek told ADN.

“hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.”

-desmond tutu

credits: alaska dispatch news, erik shilling, university of alaska- fairbanks, atlas obscura