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Completely Customize Your Breakfast

With a Touchscreen Toaster

That Has 60 Different Settings

Revolution/Amazon
Toasters seem to have a mind of their own. One day your bagel pops out perfectly golden brown, and the next, the same setting burns it to a crisp. Revolution’s touchscreen toaster ($280) looks to take the guesswork out of your morning routine by offering 60 different toast settings for basically any form of carbohydrate you throw in there.

This toaster, which sports a 4.4-star rating on Amazon, works just as well with frozen waffles and multi-grain bread as it does for Pop-Tarts and bakery-fresh bagels. All you have to do is program the toaster with what food you want to crisp, the state it’s in (frozen, fresh, etc.), and what color level you want it to be when it pops out.

Once set, the countdown clock will start and an alarm will ring to let you know when it’s done. There’s even a built-in mechanism that adjusts to the size of whatever you’re toasting to ensure all of your food pops out high enough to grab safely with your fingers. The Revolution toaster doesn’t require any pre-heating time, and the company claims it’s 35 percent faster than other versions.

personal note:

this stresses me out just reading about it,

i would need a tech geek to come with the toaster.

“television is like the american toaster, you push the button and the same thing pops up every time.”

-alfred hitchcock

 

 

article source: Elaine Selna/Mental Floss

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I’m not gonna’ lie, i’m pretty good with toast.

 

“What is the right way to cut a piece of toast?”Diagonally, insists the narrator in NIcholson Baker’s novel “The Mezzanine.” It creates a “triangularly cut slice” which in turn yields “an ideal first bit.” With rectangular toast, you must “angle the shape into your mouth, as you angle a big dresser through a hall doorway.” (Dwight Garner, NYT book critic’s new essay on the literature of breakfast food.)

“i have trouble with toast. toast is very difficult.

you have to watch it all the time or it burns up.”

-julia child, master chef (1912-2004)

 

credits: New York Times, Dwight Garner, Nicholson Baker,”The Mezzanine”, google images

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