Tag Archives: teachers

goodnight, good sir.

Standard

RIP to *Sir Ken Robinson, an eloquent and indefatigable defender of the role of the arts and creativity in education. His TED talks made him world-famous—his presentation called “Do schools kill creativity?” remains the most popular TED talk of all time, and he wrote widely, including major books on creativity in 2001 and 2015. Robinson was knighted in 2003 for his distinguished career in service to the arts.  He was a staunch critic of standardized tests and compliance-based classrooms, and an unapologetic champion of every kind of creative endeavor—from theater, to music, film, painting, dance, and everything in between. He died peacefully yesterday at the age of 70, after a brief battle with cancer, surrounded by his family. His voice will be greatly missed. – Edutopia

“the answer is not to standardize education,

but to personalize and customize it to the needs of each child and community.

there is no alternative. there never was.”

-Sir Ken Robinson, (one of my heroes in the field of education)

 

 

*Sir Ken Robinson was an author, speaker and international advisor on education in the arts to government, non-profits, education and arts bodies.

 

credits: edutopia, pbs.org

keep the heart touchable.

Standard

doing virtual early childhood parent-teacher conferences online

did not feel natural

but i give parents so much credit

some went to elaborate lengths

to find a space and time

where their child wouldn’t find them

so we could openly talk

and share stories

about how their child

touched our hearts this year

we talked to parents

in a closet, in a basement, up in an attic room,

and those who sent their child off on an errand

some waited until their child was asleep at night

but one thing was the same

this was a wonderful group of supportive, think-on-their-feet parents

who kept our connection with their children going

even from a distance

as we all navigated our way through this uncharted territory

and we were so lucky to have them as our teaching and learning partners this year.

 

“in a world where the great technologies enable us to record, replay, cut and paste, zoom in, and delete –

listening is the crucial commitment to keep the heart touchable.”

-mark nepo

 

 

 

photo credit: bored panda

wisdom and kindness.

Standard

what a lovely afternoon spent

with a family whose three daughters

 each of us have taught and loved in our turn over the years

as they gave thanks to all of their teachers

by cooking and serving us an amazing brunch

at a beautiful table

complete with many homemade delights

main courses, sweets, desserts, coffee, and fruit prosecos

dad and daughters prepare our meal

while mom finalizes the drinks and details in the dining room

such an amazing and generous gesture

as their last daughter leaves the familiar comfort

of our elementary school

and moves on to her next chapter

in the middle school division

along with her lovely family

who we will miss

and who have taught their daughters

the wisdom of gratitude and kindness.

“what wisdom can you find that is greater than kindness?”

-jean-jacques rousseau

windows.

Standard

unnamed-1 (1)

“the quiet house” on the 3-6 year old children’s playground

on a trip to visit schools in north carolina

i loved meeting the young children

and

i loved meeting the educators who 

understood the importance 

of using

play, compassion, kindness, projects, community

and

hands-on learning

when teaching young children. 

i met many people who were so passionate

about

education and children and life in general.

what a lot i learned from them. 


the whole purpose of education is to turn mirrors into windows.
– sydney j. harris

 

stumble not.

Standard

chinese-shopping-mall-6701436-o (1)

traveling with my co-workers

to meet fellow educators

i was faced with a snap decision.

with one of us busy on her phone

working to get transportation from the airport

and the other already at the bottom

i suddenly realized i was left carrying two rolling bags.

while standing at the top of the moving stairs

and people piling up behind me.

i quickly did the math

and decided that:

me – one human

plus

they – two rolling bags

would probably not all

safely make it down at the same time.

so instead of a minus one situation

at the end of the equation

 i heaved my companion’s bag

right onto the escalator

all on it’s own

let it just gently bounce and roll down

figured it could take care of itself

alerted them to look out for it at the bottom

though when they looked up

they were too busy laughing

to realize the gravity of the situation

and somehow

it all ended well. 

humans and bags both

none the worse for wear.

survival instinct kicked in

at just the right moment.

and that is why we are teachers.

we are always learning.

i feel that i might be good in a landslide situation.

or a kindergarten classroom.

“let thy step be slow and steady, that thou stumble not.”

-ieyasu tokugawa